Category Archives: WTEC

** What policies encourage high-technology manufacturing?

We presented this paper at the ISSI conference in Istanbul in June, 2015, and got out before the bombing started.
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Causal Connections Between Scientometric Indicators:
Which Ones Best Explain High-Technology Manufacturing Outputs?

R. D. Shelton ,T. R. Fadel, P. Foland
WTEC, 1653 Lititz Pike #417, Lancaster, PA 17601 (USA)

Abstract
Scientometric models can connect indicators via cross-country correlations, but these are not enough to assert causality. Sometimes a causal connection can be argued from the physical process. In other cases the causality or its direction is not clear, and the Granger test is often used to clarify the connection. Here it was shown that gross expenditures on R&D (GERD) Granger caused scientific papers in the U.S., EU, and some others, which has policy implications. Granger causality also reinforces earlier findings on why the EU passed the U.S. in papers in the mid-1990s. Downstream, it is difficult to prove the connection between research and gross domestic product (GDP), since the contributions of science are diluted by other factors. New data allows a focus on a sector that is more closely associated with science: high technology (HT) manufacturing outputs. This value-added data permits more accurate models for today’s international supply chains. Correlations show that business expenditures on R&D (BERD) and scientific indicators like patents are closely connected with HT manufacturing outputs. However for BERD, either direction of causality is plausible, and enough countries had significant results to show that causality can indeed be in either direction. The connections between papers and patents with HT manufacturing were also investigated; in several countries patents could be said to have Granger caused HT manufacturing.

Link to Paper Text

** June 2, 2015 Workshop on Nanomodular Materials & Systems by Design

The study is on design and assembly of nanoscale materials into useful devices. It uses a case study based on the exciting new two-dimensional materials like graphene, which are particularly promising for applications in electronics, energy storage, coatings, and other fields.

This study is being conducted by a panel of experts chaired by Pulickel Ajayan from Rice University. Others on the panel include: Kaustav Banerjee (UCSB),
Don Brenner (NCSU), Ahmed Busnaina (Northeastern), Padma Gopalan (Wisconsin), and Charlie Johnson (Penn).  In March the panel visited top labs in Asia–Singapore, China, Japan, and Korea.  In April the team went to Europe–Switzerland, France, Belgium, Ireland, and UK. They also organized a half-dozen workshops abroad to help gather information.

The final workshop will be held at NSF from 8AM to 4PM, in Room 1235, the boardroom of the National Science Board. There is more information at http://wtec.org/nmsd  The workshop will also be webcast and archived for later viewing at http://www.tvworldwide.com/events/nsf/150602/

 

 

R. D. Shelton

** Brain Imaging Report Published

Baltimore, MD, January 19, 2015 – The WTEC report on international study of neuroimaging is now posted at http://www.wtec.org/neuralimaging/docs/Neuroimaging-FinalReport-Web.pdf

The study was funded by NSF, the National Institutes of Health, and the Office of Naval Research. It was conducted by seven expert panelists who carried out peer reviews of research abroad. This included visiting the sites of the research institutions and researchers who are noted for the most advanced work in Europe, Asia, and Australia. More than 30 foreign sites were visited during 2013-2014,

The panel evaluated emerging computational neurodiagnostic methods. The findings include: MRI acquisition strategies for advancing neuroscience, interpretation and analysis of the fMRI signal. Use of MRI, fMRI, CAT, PET, ECG, EEG, SCR, voxel-based morphometry, endocrine sampling, and near-infrared spectroscopy to detect neural signatures of psychiatric and behavioral disorders, plus computing infrastructure and more.

The neuroimaging panel was chaired by Prof. Lilianne Mujica-Parodi from Stony Brook University. Also on the panel were Dr. Peter Bandettini from the National Institute of Mental Health, Prof. Bin He of the University of Minnesota, Dr. Tom Cortese of the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, Prof. Gary Glover from Stanford University, Prof. Tor Wager of the University of Colorado, and Dr. Lawrence Wald of the Martinos Center at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

For more information, please visit the WTEC neuralimaging page for more information. A link to the webcast of the final workshop is posted there.

 

R. D. Shelton

About WTEC:

The World Technology Evaluation Center is the nation’s leading organization in conducting international technology assessments via peer review. WTEC has conducted over 70 such studies since 1989 under grants from a variety of Federal agencies. For more information, visit WTEC.

For more information: Ms. Patricia Foland, Vice President for International Operations, WTEC, pfoland@scienceus.org, Phone: 410-691-1579.

** Renewable Energy and Systems Engineering: An International Perspective

WTEC has recently completed a study on the R&D being done around the world to help renewable energy fit into existing energy infrastructures, like electrical grids.  That requires systems engineering on a scale beyond anything done before.  To make progress, WTEC sent a team of U.S. experts to top labs in Europe and Asia to bring back good ideas.  The final report is at http://wtec.org/SEEM/  A video version of the final workshop has been archived and can be viewed by registering at: http://www.tvworldwide.com/events/nsf/130314/

About WTEC:
The World Technology Evaluation Center is the nation’s leading organization in conducting international technology assessments via peer review. WTEC has conducted over 70 such studies since 1989 under grants from many Federal agencies. For more information, visit http://www.wtec.org.

** Engineering Solutions for Cancer: An International Perspective

Baltimore, MD, February 1, 2014.  The final report of the WTEC “APHELION” study has been published.  The study was done by a team of American experts who visited some of the world’s best labs in Asia, Europe, and Israel.  The scope included the application of concepts from the physical sciences and engineering to cancer treatment and to biological sciences generally.   The study was sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, NSF, and NIBIB.  Prof. Paul Janmey from Penn was the chair.

 

There is more information about the study at  http://www.wtec.org/aphelion/

The webinar from the final workshop is archived at http://www.tvworldwide.com/events/NIH/131121/

The final report is posted at  http://www.wtec.org/aphelion/AphelionFinalReport-web.pdf

 

About WTEC:

The World Technology Evaluation Center is the nation’s leading organization in conducting international technology assessments via peer review. WTEC has conducted over 70 such studies since 1989 under grants from a variety of Federal agencies. For more information, visit WTEC.

For more information: Ms. Patricia Foland, Vice President for International Operations, WTEC, pfoland@scienceus.org, Phone: 410-691-1579.

 

Stem Cell Engineering: An International Perspective

Baltimore, MD, July 1, 2014.  Springer has just published an attractive new book based on the WTEC study on stem cell engineering.  There’s more information about the study at http://wtec.org/SCE/  To purchase the book, just go to amazon.com and search on the author’s name Robert Nerem.

About WTEC:

The World Technology Evaluation Center is the nation’s leading organization in conducting international technology assessments via peer review. WTEC has conducted over 70 such studies since 1989 under grants from a variety of Federal agencies. For more information, visit WTEC.

For more information: Ms. Patricia Foland, Vice President for International Operations, WTEC, pfoland@scienceus.org, Phone: 410-691-1579.

** BioManufacturing R&D: An International Perspective

What’s the next big thing in replaceable body parts?

Cyborgs are trending from science fiction to reality shows. People with superior artificial parts have been fantasies since at least the popular 1970s sitcom, the Six Million Dollar Man, and many films that explore the possibilities. Now science fact is rapidly catching up with science fiction.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if you could buy spare parts for your body, just as you do for your car? Researchers around the world are pursuing this dream, and are making great progress. More and more spare parts are already being used to help patients recover from burns, bum knees, and even failure of whole organs. While artificial organ transplants are now limited to relatively simple ones like bladders, researchers are working on much more ambitious goals like kidneys, livers, and even hearts. (Brains are not included! Yet.)

Some of America’s top experts on the exciting new field of bio manufacturing recently visited the some of the best labs in Europe and Asia to bring back good ideas. They will present their results at a workshop on November 5, and you can attend for free. Just go to http://www.tvworldwide.com/events/nsf/141105/ to register.  Or you can call 410-691-1579.

About WTEC:

The World Technology Evaluation Center is the nation’s leading organization in conducting international technology assessments via peer review. WTEC has conducted over 70 such studies since 1989 under grants from a variety of Federal agencies. For more information, visit WTEC.

For more information: Ms. Patricia Foland, Vice President for International Operations, WTEC, pfoland@scienceus.org, Phone: 410-691-1579.

 

R. D. Shelton

 

WTEC output on 2/15/11

Yesterday I picked up from the Baltimore office the final report for the scalable software workshop.  This is an important contribution to an important problem.  Dave Nelson, Ben Benokraitis, and Patricia Foland did a very good job in making this a big success.

Last night I heard that the paper by Shelton and Leydesdorff was accepted for presentation at the ISSI conference in Durban in July; I passed out hardcopies of this at our last staff meeting.  Yesterday I also submitted a longer version to the Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology.  Loet posted this one at a preprint service hosted at Cornell. http://arxiv.org/abs/1102.3047 

Yesterday we also finished a draft of the brochure summary of the nanoEHS stategy, which I will bring to NNCO today.  Patricia, Matt, David, and I have been crashing on this for the last few days.  I think this looks very good, but we’ll see what the client thinks.  In any event, we will now turn our attention back to the similar brochure on Nano2.  OmniStudio is going to prettify both.

I suppose that Geoff and company are also finishing their supplement to the President’s FY2012 budget, a document with considerably higher stakes.

R. D. Shelton

New WTEC Book on Nanocatalysis [sic]

 

This handsome new book has been published by the Imperial College Press based on a 2009 WTEC study on nanocatalysis.  Actually the title is An International Assessment of Research and Development in Catalysis by Nanostructured Materials.  Robert Davis of the Unversity of Virginia was chair of the WTEC expert panel, and is listed as the book’s editor. 

We learned the hard way in the course of the study that the shorthand title, “nanocatalysis,” is touchy.  Some in the catalysis community believe that catalysts have always operated at nano scales and thus research on nanotechnogy is nothing new.  Of course, you could say the same thing about any field of nanotechnology, since everything is made out of atoms.  What is really new about the field of nanotechnology is new tools that permit manipulation of matter at nanometer scales, thus the full title we used.

The book is available from the publisher for $99 at http://www.worldscibooks.com/chemistry/p772.html  Amazon doesn’t have it in stock yet.  Or you could download the full text from wtec.org for free.

 R. D. Shelton

Innovation in the State of the Union Address

For decades the US innovation community has been trying to get the attention of the White House and Congress for this issue, which has been way down on the list of Washington priorities.  This grassroots lobbying effort has been greatly handicapped by not having the money to buy access that some other lobbies have.  Still, some modest success was gained with the NIH doubling initiative, the American Competitiveness Initiative, and the America COMPETES Act.  Except for the NIH money and a small portion of the ARRA stimulus bill, this has been mostly talk and not much action.  At last we’ve got the attention of the White House, and maybe the Congress.  When a State of the Union address from the President to the Congress is focused almost entirely on this issue, we’ve got the best lobbyist in town on our side. 

WTEC has played a very small role in this movement though its pointing with alarm abroad.  With this new attention at the highest levels, we are positioned to do a lot more.  This President reaffirmed President Truman’s 1950 goal in the address,  “Maintaining our leadership in research and technology is crucial to America’s success.”  Logically, if one has a goal, it is necessary to measure progress toward that goal.  Measuring world leadership of S&T is our middle name: World Technology Evaluation Center, Inc.  And we have a 20-year record of doing more of this than anyone else by the on-site, peer review method that some believe is the most accurate method.

I think we are ideally positioned to take advantage of this new priority that our issue has in Washington.  As the country as a whole focuses on competing in innovation worldwide, WTEC and WTIP should focus on redoubling our efforts to do our part to help.  And as in the case of the country as a whole, we have a very tangible motivation for this: our prosperity depends on it.