Category Archives: Reports

** Brain Imaging Report Published

Baltimore, MD, January 19, 2015 – The WTEC report on international study of neuroimaging is now posted at http://www.wtec.org/neuralimaging/docs/Neuroimaging-FinalReport-Web.pdf

The study was funded by NSF, the National Institutes of Health, and the Office of Naval Research. It was conducted by seven expert panelists who carried out peer reviews of research abroad. This included visiting the sites of the research institutions and researchers who are noted for the most advanced work in Europe, Asia, and Australia. More than 30 foreign sites were visited during 2013-2014,

The panel evaluated emerging computational neurodiagnostic methods. The findings include: MRI acquisition strategies for advancing neuroscience, interpretation and analysis of the fMRI signal. Use of MRI, fMRI, CAT, PET, ECG, EEG, SCR, voxel-based morphometry, endocrine sampling, and near-infrared spectroscopy to detect neural signatures of psychiatric and behavioral disorders, plus computing infrastructure and more.

The neuroimaging panel was chaired by Prof. Lilianne Mujica-Parodi from Stony Brook University. Also on the panel were Dr. Peter Bandettini from the National Institute of Mental Health, Prof. Bin He of the University of Minnesota, Dr. Tom Cortese of the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, Prof. Gary Glover from Stanford University, Prof. Tor Wager of the University of Colorado, and Dr. Lawrence Wald of the Martinos Center at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

For more information, please visit the WTEC neuralimaging page for more information. A link to the webcast of the final workshop is posted there.

 

R. D. Shelton

About WTEC:

The World Technology Evaluation Center is the nation’s leading organization in conducting international technology assessments via peer review. WTEC has conducted over 70 such studies since 1989 under grants from a variety of Federal agencies. For more information, visit WTEC.

For more information: Ms. Patricia Foland, Vice President for International Operations, WTEC, pfoland@scienceus.org, Phone: 410-691-1579.

** Engineering Solutions for Cancer: An International Perspective

Baltimore, MD, February 1, 2014.  The final report of the WTEC “APHELION” study has been published.  The study was done by a team of American experts who visited some of the world’s best labs in Asia, Europe, and Israel.  The scope included the application of concepts from the physical sciences and engineering to cancer treatment and to biological sciences generally.   The study was sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, NSF, and NIBIB.  Prof. Paul Janmey from Penn was the chair.

 

There is more information about the study at  http://www.wtec.org/aphelion/

The webinar from the final workshop is archived at http://www.tvworldwide.com/events/NIH/131121/

The final report is posted at  http://www.wtec.org/aphelion/AphelionFinalReport-web.pdf

 

About WTEC:

The World Technology Evaluation Center is the nation’s leading organization in conducting international technology assessments via peer review. WTEC has conducted over 70 such studies since 1989 under grants from a variety of Federal agencies. For more information, visit WTEC.

For more information: Ms. Patricia Foland, Vice President for International Operations, WTEC, pfoland@scienceus.org, Phone: 410-691-1579.

 

Stem Cell Engineering: An International Perspective

Baltimore, MD, July 1, 2014.  Springer has just published an attractive new book based on the WTEC study on stem cell engineering.  There’s more information about the study at http://wtec.org/SCE/  To purchase the book, just go to amazon.com and search on the author’s name Robert Nerem.

About WTEC:

The World Technology Evaluation Center is the nation’s leading organization in conducting international technology assessments via peer review. WTEC has conducted over 70 such studies since 1989 under grants from a variety of Federal agencies. For more information, visit WTEC.

For more information: Ms. Patricia Foland, Vice President for International Operations, WTEC, pfoland@scienceus.org, Phone: 410-691-1579.

WTEC output on 2/15/11

Yesterday I picked up from the Baltimore office the final report for the scalable software workshop.  This is an important contribution to an important problem.  Dave Nelson, Ben Benokraitis, and Patricia Foland did a very good job in making this a big success.

Last night I heard that the paper by Shelton and Leydesdorff was accepted for presentation at the ISSI conference in Durban in July; I passed out hardcopies of this at our last staff meeting.  Yesterday I also submitted a longer version to the Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology.  Loet posted this one at a preprint service hosted at Cornell. http://arxiv.org/abs/1102.3047 

Yesterday we also finished a draft of the brochure summary of the nanoEHS stategy, which I will bring to NNCO today.  Patricia, Matt, David, and I have been crashing on this for the last few days.  I think this looks very good, but we’ll see what the client thinks.  In any event, we will now turn our attention back to the similar brochure on Nano2.  OmniStudio is going to prettify both.

I suppose that Geoff and company are also finishing their supplement to the President’s FY2012 budget, a document with considerably higher stakes.

R. D. Shelton

New WTEC Book on Nanocatalysis [sic]

 

This handsome new book has been published by the Imperial College Press based on a 2009 WTEC study on nanocatalysis.  Actually the title is An International Assessment of Research and Development in Catalysis by Nanostructured Materials.  Robert Davis of the Unversity of Virginia was chair of the WTEC expert panel, and is listed as the book’s editor. 

We learned the hard way in the course of the study that the shorthand title, “nanocatalysis,” is touchy.  Some in the catalysis community believe that catalysts have always operated at nano scales and thus research on nanotechnogy is nothing new.  Of course, you could say the same thing about any field of nanotechnology, since everything is made out of atoms.  What is really new about the field of nanotechnology is new tools that permit manipulation of matter at nanometer scales, thus the full title we used.

The book is available from the publisher for $99 at http://www.worldscibooks.com/chemistry/p772.html  Amazon doesn’t have it in stock yet.  Or you could download the full text from wtec.org for free.

 R. D. Shelton

NSB Warns that Globalization is a Threat the US Science Leadership

The National Science Board was apparently so alarmed by the findings in the latest SEI2010 that it has released a companion report calling for remedial action–Globalization of Science and Engineering Research.    The last paragraph of the letter of transmittal from Chair Steven Beering says, “We urge Federal attention and action to sustain U.S. world leadership in S&E in response to growing S&E capacity around the world.  Our nation’s future prosperity and security depend on a strong and unwavering Federal committment to this goal.”

One of three major recommendations calls for OSTP to engage all Federal research agencies to: (a) develop means to assess or continue to assess the quality of their agency’s supported research against international activities, and (b) to identify and as appropriate make adjustments necessary to ensure that their agency’s research is world-leading.”

NSF/ENG is already doing a good deal of this through the WTEC program, and other international activities.  I wonder if the NSB knows.

Of course, I have been saying much the same thing for years in this blog and elsewhere.  It’s gratifying to have others come to the same realization.

R. D. Shelton

Yet More Alarms from Manufacturing Technology News

I got a free copy of the Feb. 12 issue via email from the editor, Richard McCormack.  I haven’t been subscribing to this newsletter,  since I was too cheap to spring for the $495 per year.  This issue convinces me that I have to subscribe, since it covers “Innovation, Globalization, and Industrial Competitiveness,”  much the same scope as this blog.  For example, some of the articles this time were:

1. US Becomes a Bit Player in Global Semiconductor Industry. 

2. Obama Puts International Comparison Program on Chopping Block

3. NIST’s Chief Economist: US Needs a New Direction

4. US Government Finds Thousands of Fake Parts in DOD Supply Chains

5. First Time Ever: [DOD] QDR Addresses Decline of US Industrial Base

All of these articles document decline of American S&T.  For example the first one reports the shocking statistic that in 2009 the US started construction of one (1) semiconductor fabrication (fab) plant in 2009.  The PRC started six (6), Taiwan five (5), then next was the EU, Korea, Japan, and the US, all with one (1) each.  Further, China considers Taiwan to also be its turf, and they are already de facto one and the same in the IT sector.   Thus Greater China started more than twice as many fabs as the rest of the world put together–and eleven times that of the US alone, which invented this business, of course.

http://www.manufacturingnews.com

R. D. Shelton

2010 Edition of NSF S&EI Shows US Decline

Every two years the NSF/SRS Division produces a wonderful collection of science and engineering indicators, mostly on the US, but with a lot of international comparisons.  Many analysts, including myself, use the data that they have compiled to draw additional conclusions.  I’ll post an example of this next.

For some years I have been pointing with alarm at the loss of US S&T leadership, based this data and other sources.  This year NSF is finally highlighting the same issue, after years of downplaying it.  The first sentence in their press release announcing the report says, “The state of the science and engineering (S&E) enterprise in America is strong, yet its lead is slipping…” which is attributed to Rolf Lehming.  In the next paragraph, Kei Kozumi of OSTP, says, “U.S. dominance has eroded significantly.”

The press release has links to the report and its data in .pdf  and .xls format.

 http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=116238&org=NSF&from=news

R. D. Shelton

India and China: An Advanced Technology Race and How the US Should Respond, by Ernest Preeg

I’m shocked that I am the first person to post a review for this book, which has a most alarming message. Americans really ought to read this book, and try to do something about the problems it uncovers.

Ambassador Preeg makes a convincing case that China will soon become an economic, technological, and military superpower, ending the brief period since 1991 when the US enjoyed that status alone. (India is also coming up strong, but it will be many years until it achieves superpower status.) Moreover, many of the stunning gains made by China, such as world market share of high technology products, come at the expense of the US, so that they represent a double whammy. He identifies the distorted exchange rate between the US dollar and the Chinese yuan, artificially supported by purchases of up to a half trillion in dollars per year by the PRC central bank, as being the single most important cause of much of the gains of China.

The author also lays out a long list of international and domestic actions that the US could take to better compete with China, whose merchantilistic trade policies are in no way consistent with free trade. The Obama Administration seems to be somewhat more likely to take action than the Bush Administration was, but there is a long way to go, and the US public seems to be oblivious to the danger it faces. Also important vested interests in the US have a stake in China’s continued advance at our expense. Preeg believes our actions will be aided by China being soon be forced to revalue its currency, and that they will also soon introduce the promised (one party) “democracy.” I hope so, but I’m more skeptical. I do have one more remedy to add: Americans might decide that cheap Chinese products are a danger to their economic and military security, as well as to their health.

Online Access to CRS Reports

Reports from the Congressional Research Service are not directly available to the public. When I worked as a congressional staffer I had access to reports, and I have missed them ever since. Now several organizations get reports through Members of Congress and post them.  The Federation of American Scientists has a comprehensive site, and has links to other similar archives.

http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/index.html

 Here is a sample of 2009 CRS reports on S&T.

OSTP http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL34736.pdf

S&T Policy Making http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL34454.pdf

Federal R&D Funding http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL34448.pdf

NNI http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL34401.pdf

S&T Workforce http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL34539.pdf

S&T in Diplomacy http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL34503.pdf

America COMPETES Act FY2010

 http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R40519.pdf

R. D. Shelton