books.htm0000644000076400007650000002604012113733653011412 0ustar wtecwtec World Technology Evaluation Center: Books

Books

World Technology Evaluation Center

Below are some books published on WTEC studies. Click on the book title in the citation to view its contents:










Copyright © [2012] World Technology Evaluation Center, Inc. (WTEC). All rights reserved.

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Coop Agreement no. ENG-0844639 and other NSF awards. Other Federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Department of Energy, and others.
\f1 } conferences.htm0000644000076400007650000001672212113733652012574 0ustar wtecwtec World Technology Evaluation Center: Conferences

Conferences

World Technology Evaluation Center

Below are some conferences attended by WTEC and its staff. Click on the conference to view its documents:




Copyright © [2012] World Technology Evaluation Center, Inc. (WTEC). All rights reserved.

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Coop Agreement no. ENG-0844639 and other NSF awards. Other Federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Department of Energy, and others.
\f1 } contact.htm0000644000076400007650000001543712114730741011734 0ustar wtecwtec World Technology Evaluation Center: Directions


[Contact] Email Address

Because of spam, WTEC receives email at one central address:
AllMail AT wtec DOT org to be read weekly by a long suffering intern. For urgent communications please use WTEC-MD fax number.

[Contact] WTEC Locations

   WTEC-PA
    Mailing Address
    1653 Lititz Pike, #417         Lancaster, PA 17601
    717 299 7130
    Fax: 717 299 7131

   WTEC-MD
    518 S. Camp Meade Rd.
    Suite 6
    Linthicum, MD 21090
                410-691-1579
    Fax: 410-993-1

   WTEC-VA
   NNCO Stafford II-405
    4201 Wilson Blvd.
    Arlington, VA 22203
    703-292-8626
    Fax: 703-292-9312

Driving Directions

World Technology Evaluation Center



WTEC-PA: Lancaster, PA

    448 Murry Hill Circle, Lancaster, PA 17601

WTEC-MD: Baltimore, MD

    518 S. Camp Meade Rd., Linthicum, MD 21090

WTEC-VA: Arlington, VA

   4201 Wilson Blvd., NNCO Stafford II-405, Arlington, VA 22203

Copyright © [2013] World Technology Evaluation Center, Inc. (WTEC). All rights reserved.

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Coop Agreement no. ENG-0844639 and other NSF awards. Other Federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Department of Energy, and others.
copyright.htm0000664000076400007650000000566611377517753012336 0ustar wtecwtec Copyright Notice and Limited License

World Technology Evaluation Center, Inc.
4800 Roland Avenue
Suite 201
Baltmore, MD 21210
410.467.9832



Copyright Notice and Limited License

Material contained herein is extracted from printed reports copyrighted 1993-2001 by Loyola College in Maryland and copyrighted 2002 by WTEC Inc. It is based on studies sponsored by the National Science Foundation and other agencies of the United States Government under a series of NSF grants and cooperative agreements with Loyola College in Maryland and WTEC Inc. As such, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive and nontransferable license to exercise all exclusive rights provided by copyright. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the United States Government, the authors' parent institutions, Loyola College or WTEC Inc.

Users are licensed to read and download this material free of charge.

WTEC encourages downloading and re-use of this information, subject to the following limitations:

  1. This material may not be re-packaged for sale in any form without the expressed written permission of WTEC Inc.
  2. This material may be distributed in modified or edited form with the expressed written permission of WTEC Inc. Please include information on your target audience and the purpose of distribution in your permission request. This copyright license notice must accompany all distributions of any material extracted from this server.

For further information, contact Geoff Holdridge, WTEC, Inc. Vice-President, at gholdrid@wtec.org



World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC), Inc.; Baltimore, MD: For more information contact www@wtec.org.
employment.htm0000644000076400007650000001230012146464763012471 0ustar wtecwtec WTEC: Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

World Technology Evaluation Center

WTEC Web 2.0 wtec_youtube wtec_headlines wtec_email E-Mail WTEC

Currently open positions

 

Copyright © [2013] World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC). All rights reserved

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Coop Agreement no. ENG-0844639 and other NSF awards. Other federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Food and Drug Administration.
mc_limited_help.htm0000644000076400007650000006734611377517756013450 0ustar wtecwtec MajorCool Help

MajorCool is a Web interface to the Majordomo mailing list management tool. Whereas Majordomo is a rather unforgiving command-driven application that utilizes e-mail for effecting changes, MajorCool adds a Web-based front-end to provide a user-friendly interface to list manager operations.

Rather than focusing on command syntax, MajorCool is designed around the practical activities of mailing list access such as browsing, modifying, creating, renaming, and deleting.

Each of these modes are optional, since the site administrator may elect to disable support for certain modules. They are accessed through the URL that MajorCool was installed as -- /cgi-bin/majordomo by default. In addition, multiple installations of MajorCool can be supported on the same system, each with its own unique URL. For instance, it is not uncommon to see the BROWSE and MODIFY modules split into separate MajorCool installations. (If some actions are unavailable in your instance of MajorCool, check with your site administrator to see if there might be alternative URLs available.)

The selection of actions is made from a menu-based interface (with the desired modules chosen via a button-bar), or full-screen with all actions visible on the main page. Screen Capture: ButtonBar Menu The display of menu- vs. full-screen is defined by a per-user Preferences setting. Since the menu interface is the default presentation, all references to MajorCool actions in this guide will be shown relative to menu mode. Pressing a menu button will take you to the appropriate module; the current module is indicated by a "depressed" (gray) button. What follows is a description of each available mode.

[BROWSE] [Thumbnail] [Thumbnail] [Thumbnail]

BROWSE mode is the act of viewing list information and/or changing subscription status to the lists served by Majordomo. In order for the browsing process to begin, the user is first queried for his/her e-mail address. The user also has the option at this time to limit the browsing to:

To say that the user is prompted for an e-mail address may be an over-simplification, depending upon the installation. Although an e-mail address is required, how that address information is obtained is ultimately up to the site administrator. Screen Capture: Browsing MajorCool has the ability to query external address mapping functions via it's siteaddr() interface, so it may be that a particular site prompts instead for a username, letting the defined mapping function produce a valid e-mail address in return.

When the "go" button is pressed, the e-mail address (or other appropriate value) is processed by the defined siteaddr() function to produce an address search string. This will be used to compare against the addresses in the Majordomo lists. A set of valid list-names will be displayed as a result. Since a siteaddr() function can produce an address pattern as well as a fixed string, the matching method allows MajorCool to catch multiple addresses that a user might be subscribed under rather than just a single address as is typical for Majordomo.

If "QuickView Mode" is selected prior to invoking the BROWSE, list subscription tests will be disabled, thus speeding access to the list overview at the cost of disabling subscription changes at the global list level. Even when in QuickView mode, the user will still have the ability to alter subscription choices at each individual List Detail view.

Subscribe/Unsubscribe Screen

If the "Find" option is used with "Exact Match" enabled, and assuming such a list exists, the user is taken directly to the List Details screen. In all other cases, Screen Capture: Subscribe Checkbox the result of a BROWSE action is to display a set of list names (matching the selected criteria) as a table of checkboxes, list names, and list descriptions. The list names are hyperlinked to allow a drill-down to additional list details.

After modifying subscription selections via checkbox, the user applies the changes and the submission is compared against the last known subscription selections. Any changes will be converted into the appropriate Majordomo 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' commands using the user's "primary address" (as defined by the siteaddr() results).

If subscription tests were disabled via the "QuickView" option, there will be no checkboxes on this screen to indicate membership or allow the user to toggle subscriptions. Subscription changes, however, are available at the Details view for each list.

List Details

Drill-down to a particular list shows additional list information such as the list-owner address, access to the list's info and intro files, list membership, and other subscriber details. Depending on the security restrictions of the browsed list and how much the site administrator "trusts" its users, selected list details will either be presented onscreen or returned to the user via e-mail.

Screen Capture: Subscribe Toggle A button is available in the Detail view to toggle subscription status, allowing the user to subscribe using the primary address or unsubscribe the current subscribed-as address.

Screen Capture: Modify Access If the user browsing the the list has knowledge of the admin password, the Details screen also provides an entry-point into the MODIFY mode for the displayed list.

When viewing list subscribers, if the list contains other lists as members ("nested lists") the entries will be shown in bold or as hyperlinks, depending upon current preference settings. If linked, further drill-down will access the detail or subscriber screen for that nested list (also controlled by preferences).

[MODIFY] [Thumbnail] [Thumbnail] [Thumbnail] [Thumbnail] [Thumbnail]

The MODIFY module provides access to the list-manager functions for a selected list. The user is prompted for a list name (via typed entry or pull-down menu) and the list password. The list administrator has the option of choosing to modify the:

When the "go" button is pressed, the password is validated and, if successful, the user is given access to one of the following list configuration functions:

Configuration Options

Screen Capture: Config Entry From the CONFIGURATION OPTIONS screen, administrators can change configuration items such as list description, subscription policy, approve password, and much more. HTML buttons and other elements are used to simplify configuration for the beginner. Majordomo configuration option keyword entries are heavily commented, and MajorCool provides onscreen display of this field-level "help".

Screen Capture: Keyword Scope Admins can access a simplified set of list config keywords (defined by the site owner), the entire set of Majordomo keywords, or only those pertaining to a specific subsystem.

Although it is not the intent of this guide to provide a Majordomo tutorial, here are some list-management concepts to be aware of when configuring your list. Options in the Majordomo list configuration file control behaviors such as:

When changes are made to the config file and submitted, the update is carried out by sending a 'newconfig' command to Majordomo.

Screen Capture: Modify Other Additional buttons are provided on the Options screen that will take the administrator to the other areas that can be modified (e.g. the list intro file or the list itself).

Subscriber Administration

The SUBSCRIBER ADMINISTRATION screen allows the list admin to view and modify the members of the list. Any changes submitted are converted to the appropriate 'subscribe' or 'unsubscribe' command and issued to Majordomo with the 'approve' qualifier.

Info File

The $list.info file is sent to all new subscribers, or returned by request via the 'info' command. Presence of a $list.intro file will override the use of the $list.info in the new subscriber greeting.

The INFO FILE page allows the list admin to view and modify this $list.info file. If changes are submitted, a 'newinfo' command is issued to Majordomo.

Intro File

The $list.intro file is sent to all new subscribers, or returned by request via the 'intro' command. Presence of a $list.intro file will override the use of the $list.info in the new subscriber greeting.

The INTRO FILE page allows the list admin to view and modify the $list.intro file. If changes are submitted, a 'newintro' command is issued to Majordomo.

Approval Queue

If the installed version of Majordomo supports it, MajorCool will also provide an APPROVAL QUEUE option. The "approval queue" is where Majordomo stores messages that were sent to the list but require moderator approval before posting (e.g. moderated lists, administrivia checks, etc).

Normally, these messages are returned in their entirety to the moderator, who must then manipulate mail headers prior to sending the message back to the list. MajorCool eliminates the need to play with e-mail and instead offers push-button approval via the Web.

Screen Capture: Approval Queue Access to the approval queue off the main screen is via the admin_pass or the approve_pass password (this is the only operation that accepts the moderator password in addition to that of the list owner). Examining the queue will show all pending messages as identified by the sender, subject, date, and message-id of the mail.

The administrator has the option to View or Edit the content of the messages prior to taking action. Such actions include approving, deleting, rejecting, or holding the message:

When editing messages in the Approval Queue, it is important to understand that the functionality is largely browser dependent. Large files, when loaded into a browser window, can be a very memory-intensive operation for the client.

Change List Password

If the site administrator has so chosen, the changing of the list-admin password can be moved to a "safer" double-entry method in this form. This section is not present if the option is disabled.

Normally, the password change is implemented as a config file update via the 'newconfig' command. However, if MajorCool detects the presence of a legacy list.pass file, the deprecated 'password' command is used instead. The exception to this is if MajorCool detects the implementation of the "master password file" technique of list.pass linked to a read-only MASTER.PASSWD.

Initiating A Digest

If the list is a digest, the owner is provided with a button to create a digest -- combining all unsent messages into a digested collection -- and sending that mail to all digest subscribers.

Send Full Config

The final form available at the list configuration level is the SEND FULL CONFIG BY EMAIL which simply issues a 'config' command to retrieve the current configuration file in the user's name.

[PREFS] [Thumbnail]

Screen Capture: Preferences The PREFS module is used to provide per-user Preference settings to all MajorCool users. Preferences are implemented via HTTP "Cookies" and are persistent across sessions. Settings are available to control admin keyword help, sorting options, and even module presentation in full-screen or menu modes.

General Options

Allow Browser To Cache Pages
Browsers can, in the interest of performance, save visited pages in their cache for easier recall. In the case of MajorCool, a cached page may reflect the state of some Majordomo data relative only to the current MajorCool session, even though changes may have been performed via e-mail or other Web users. With the Cache setting, users may enable or disable the caching of page data depending upon their own personal preferences. If caching is disabled, "backing up" to a previous screen will require the browser to re-query for current data.

Enable Style Sheet Font Control (Where Supported)
If your browser supports HTML 4.0 "Style Sheets" (CSS), you may tailor the font family and point size used on all MajorCool pages to suit your liking. This preference can be used to toggle CSS support.

Default Font Face & Point Size
Requires CSS support in the browser and the above Style Sheet Font Control preference enabled. Since not all browsers support Style Sheets or some of the referenced fonts, these settings will have no apparent effect if unsupported.

Use JavaScript Enhancements
JavaScript offers some neat user-interface "bells & whistles" such as the ability to update the browser status line or swap images when "moused over". Most browsers will ignore what they can't understand, so there is no harm for those applications that do not support JavaScript. Naturally, none of these effects are particularly critical to the operation of MajorCool, but they are certainly "cool". However if a user finds them more "annoying" than "cool", they can be disabled.

Sort Subscriber List in BROWSE and MODIFY Views
With large lists, it can be difficult at times to locate specific addresses for verification, modification, or deletion. Users may prefer to have the subscriber list sorted (using the site-configured by_siteaddr() function).

Use 'Menu' Style User Interface
MajorCool can display configured modules (e.g., BROWSE, MODIFY, CREATE, DELETE, and PREFS) in two ways. In "Menu" mode, a selection of buttons is present across the top of the screen, with the 'active' (i.e., selected) action occupying the space between the header and footer. The alternative to Menu mode is to forego the button-bar and the concept of an 'active' action, showing all available actions on the main page. Menu mode is enabled by default.

Default Action for Menu Mode
When in "Menu" mode, the initial screen shown on start-up or restart will be the first available module from the list of BROWSE/MODIFY/CREATE/DELETE. This preference is used to override that ordering and start specifically at a particular module. For example, in a BROWSE/MODIFY configuration, a list owner may choose MODIFY as the preferred action if that is the most frequently performed MajorCool activity. Selecting a module that has been disabled by the site admin will have no effect.

Default Screen Width
The default screen size of MajorCool is designed to easily fit on a 640 pixel wide screen typical of most personal computers (your browser window may need to be widened accordingly). You can set your own desired pixel width, or even have the data follow the current width of the browser by setting the width to '100%'.

Use Images for Form Buttons
MajorCool can be very graphics-intensive, all the way down to its use of images for traditional SUBMIT buttons. Some people find the plain-Jane SUBMIT/RESET buttons more effective (not to mention faster to load), so the use of images for FORM buttons can be enabled or disabled.

Tool Tips on Button Bars
Tool Tips are available on the top (Menu Mode) and bottom button bars. Simply hold the mouse over the button and a window will pop up describing its function in more detail. Tool Tips require JavaScript Enhancements enabled (above).

Browse Options

Show Nested Lists As Hyperlinks
Subscriber lists may contain other local lists as members. These can be displayed as hyperlinks to facilitate the browsing of the nested list details.

Link to Subscribers When Following Nested Lists
Nested lists can be linked to either the Detail view of the referenced list, or directly to the subscriber list itself. Detail view is the default link type.

Show Line Numbers In Subscriber List
The subscriber list can be displayed with line numbers to ease viewing/searching. Note that these line numbers are not stored as part of the Majordomo list and are not permanently bound to individual addresses. In other words, the subscriber #1 in "sorted" mode may not be the same as subscriber #1 in the unsorted display.

Modify Options

Use 2-Column Table For Configuration File
MajorCool will, by default, display the list configuration file as a 2-column table: keywords on the left, values on the right. Although this makes it easy to locate keywords, it can make for a very wide display. If disabled, a more compact single-column format is used.

Show Help With Configuration File Fields
Majordomo provides field-level help descriptions as comments in the list config file. If Help is enabled, these comments will also be visible on-screen when editing the list configuration. Since these comments use a significant amount of screen real estate, experienced users may disable their display.

Show Majordomo Subsystem For Each Configuration Field
Majordomo consists of multiple subsystems -- the aliasing/address setup, the archive program, the digest program, the Majordomo command processor, and the list itself. This option will indicate which subsystem each keyword applies to.

Maximum Size Supported By Browser TextArea
List member files are edited using what is called a TEXTAREA element. On many browsers, the number of bytes that can fit within a TEXTAREA is limited, which can cause a problem when managing lists with many subscribers. Changing the value of this Preference will not change the capability of the browser -- only the manufacturer can do that. However, what this value will do is implement a threshold at which MajorCool will attempt to take alternative actions in order to get around the limitation. Alternative actions include switching to 'append' mode, or editing a subset of the list that matches a pattern.

[RESTART] [HOME] nnco_rfp_survey-analysis-businesses.htm0000644000076400007650000005607611377517757017554 0ustar wtecwtec RFP: providing data and analysis on nanotechnology-based products and services

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

(Download PDF version)

Overview

The National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO), through the World Technology Evaluation Center, Inc. (WTEC), is interested in contracting with an organization to provide data and analysis on U.S.-based companies (and, as available, foreign companies with significant U.S. operations) offering nanotechnology-based products and services on a commercial basis.

Organizational Background 

The NNCO provides technical and administrative support to the Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology (NSET) Subcommittee of the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC). NSET is the interagency body responsible for coordinating, planning, implementing, and reviewing the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI). NSTC is one of the principal means by which the President coordinates science, space, and technology policies across the Federal Government.

WTEC supports the NNCO through a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF).  The work will be performed under a subcontract to WTEC, under the provisions of that NSF grant.

Project Description

NNCO seeks overview information and statistics about the commercialization of nanotechnology by U.S.-based companies, including current status and trends in the number and types of firms that offer nanotechnology-based products or services, number and classification of nanotechnology-enabled products on the market, nanotechnology-related revenues, and nanotechnology-based employment in the U.S. economy.  The contractor will generate an annual report listing all companies with significant U.S. operations that involve providing nanotechnology-based products or services, as well as any data that can be gathered and verified on their nanotechnology-enabled products, revenues, and employment.  The report will also include an analysis of trends over time with respect to the data being presented as well as a brief public executive summary.  Other special reports may be requested by NNCO (as additional options, to be performed on a time and materials basis).

NNCO would prefer that the database developed under this subcontract be consistent with and comparable to data produced under a previous subcontract with another vendor; these data are available for visual inspection at the NNCO office on request. Alternative (particularly improved) formats can also be suggested as options to the bid.

Bidders should specify a price for two options:  (1) a single annual report and (2) two reports per year.

This will be a one-year contract, with options to extend to a second and third year.

Target Audience 

NSET member agencies and the public.

Required Deliverables

The annual report (or bi-annual reports, depending on which option is exercised) shall include the following:

  1. A list of companies and other organizations that offer nanotechnology-based (or -enabled) products and services or that have other activities consistent with the definition of nanotechnology adopted by the NNI (see  http://nano.gov/html/facts/whatIsNano.html). Organizations for which data will be collected include:
    • R&D, manufacturing, and applications companies, including firms that supply R&D or manufacturing equipment
    • Financial services companies (e.g., venture capital firms that do a substantial amount of work with nanotechnology) as well as firms that provide other types of professional services to nanotechnology companies
    • Government organizations (Federal, state, and local agencies)
    • Non-governmental organizations and geographically-focused entities (e.g., regional, state, and local nanotechnology “initiatives” organized outside of government auspices)
    • Industry organizations and institutions
    Data to be collected on each organization including website URL, email address, phone number, mailing address, year founded, number of employees, number of employees in nanotechnology-related jobs (if available), organization description, key activity area, description of nanotechnology-related products or services offered, categorization of product or service (e.g., manufacturing equipment, raw material, consumer product, etc.), revenues from nanotechnology-related products or services (if available), primary target industry, other target industries, collaborations/collaborators, and leadership team.
  2. A list of nanotechnology-based products or services currently on the market organized by product category (e.g., manufacturing equipment, raw materials, consumer products, etc.) – derived from data in item (1) above.
  3. Estimate of total nanotechnology-related revenues, aggregated from data in item (1) above.
  4. Estimate of total nanotechnology-based employment in the U.S. economy, aggregated from data in item (1) above. 
  5. A detailed analysis and graphical representation (at least 10 pages including appropriate charts and graphs) showing significant findings and emerging trends in the data.
    1. This analytical section should also include highlights of information on new industry participants, new products, strategic partnerships and distribution/licensing agreements, financial/funding events (IPOs, VC, mergers and acquisitions, bankruptcies), government activities (legislative and economic development initiatives), patent highlights, and milestone company and industry news.
    2. This analysis should include an estimate of total “pure play” nanotechnology-based employment in the United States and an estimate of total nanotechnology-based revenue that these firms are generating – based on data from item (1) above and any other credible sources available in the open literature.
  6. An introduction explaining the methodology used to gather the data, including any cautions or caveats concerning how the data should be used or interpreted.
  7. An executive summary consisting of at least two pages of text summarizing the overall findings of the report, e.g., total number of companies, products, and employment, particularly trending information.
  8. Special reports may be requested by NNCO at additional cost, on a time and materials basis.

Assumptions and Agreements

Selection Criteria

The following criteria will be used to evaluate proposals and select the winning bidder. The criteria listed below are not listed in any particular priority order; bids will be evaluated according to their overall responsiveness to this RFP including as many as possible of the following criteria:

Required Proposal Format

The proposal must contain a (1) Technical section and (2) a Time-Cost section.

Technical Proposal

In the Technical section, the vendor should include time-lines, projected required personnel, and schedules for completing the project. Resumes of key personnel who will be working on the project should be appended to the proposal. This section should also outline the existing data and other resources that the proposer will have access to as a starting point for completing this work.

Time-Cost

In the Time-Cost section, the vendor must detail the time and costs that will be required to complete the project.

Additional Documentation (optional)

Request for References (optional)

Submission Deadline: July 30, 2007

Submit Proposal To:

Geoff Holdridge
WTEC, Inc.
4800 Roland Avenue, Suite 201
Baltimore, MD 21210-2393
gholdrid@wtec.org
703-292-4532

For additional information or clarification, contact Mr. Holdridge. Award of a subcontract is subject to review and approval by the National Science Foundation, and is subject to availability of funds and suitability of proposals submitted in response to this RFP.

papers.htm0000644000076400007650000002426712113733651011576 0ustar wtecwtec World Technology Evaluation Center: Conferences

Papers

World Technology Evaluation Center

Below are some papers written by WTEC staff. Click on the paper to view:



Copyright © [2012] World Technology Evaluation Center Inc. (WTEC). All rights reserved

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant no. ENG-0739505 and other NSF awards. Other federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Food and Drug Administration.
\f1 } proactivity.htm0000644000076400007650000001522012226053712012644 0ustar wtecwtec WTEC: Activities

Ongoing Activities

World Technology Evaluation Center

WTEC Web 2.0 wtec_youtube wtec_headlines wtec_email E-Mail WTEC

Copyright © [2013] World Technology Evaluation Center, Inc. (WTEC). All rights reserved.

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Coop Agreement no. ENG-0844639 and other NSF awards. Other Federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Department of Energy, and others.
professionalactivities.htm0000644000076400007650000001530712114730731015065 0ustar wtecwtec WTEC: Activities

Ongoing Activities

World Technology Evaluation Center

WTEC Web 2.0 wtec_youtube wtec_headlines wtec_email E-Mail WTEC

Copyright © [2013] World Technology Evaluation Center, Inc. (WTEC). All rights reserved.

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Coop Agreement no. ENG-0844639 and other NSF awards. Other Federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Department of Energy, and others.
projects.htm0000644000076400007650000001711012115157117012121 0ustar wtecwtec WTEC: Activities

Ongoing Activities

World Technology Evaluation Center

WTEC Web 2.0 wtec_youtube wtec_headlines wtec_email E-Mail WTEC

Projects in Progress

Supported Activities

  • National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO) -- The NNCO provides technical and administrative support to the Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology (NSET) Subcommittee of the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC). In addition, the NNCO is chartered to serve as the point of contact on Federal nanotechnology activities, conduct public outreach, and promote transfer of the results of Federal nanotechnology R&D for commercial use and public benefit. WTEC provides professional staff support for the NNCO office.

Copyright © [2013] World Technology Evaluation Center, Inc. (WTEC). All rights reserved.

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Coop Agreement no. ENG-0844639 and other NSF awards. Other Federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Department of Energy, and others.
reports.htm0000644000076400007650000007636712200720024011775 0ustar wtecwtec WTEC: Reports

Online Reports

World Technology Evaluation Center

WTEC Web 2.0 wtec_youtube wtec_headlines wtec_email E-Mail WTEC
search.htm0000644000076400007650000001767112114730735011553 0ustar wtecwtec WTEC: Search

Search this Site

World Technology Evaluation Center

WTEC Web 2.0 wtec_youtube wtec_headlines wtec_email E-Mail WTEC

 

Search the contents of all the publicly available WWW documents at this site.



Copyright © [2013] World Technology Evaluation Center, Inc. (WTEC). All rights reserved.

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Coop Agreement no. ENG-0844639 and other NSF awards. Other Federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Department of Energy, and others.
staff2.htm0000644000076400007650000005334111754243414011467 0ustar wtecwtec World Technology Evaluation Center: The Staff

Meet the Staff

World Technology Evaluation Center

WTEC Web 2.0 wtec_youtube wtec_headlines wtec_email E-Mail WTEC

Senior Staff

photo: shelton
R.D. Shelton
President
Professional Page

[photo: M. DeHaemer]
Michael DeHaemer
Executive Vice President

[photo: g. holdridge]
Geoff Holdridge
Vice President for
Government Services


Frank Huband
Sr. VP and General Counsel




David Nelson
Vice President for Development


[photo: A. Schwarzkopf]
Alex Schwarzkopf
Senior Policy Analist



Patricia Foland
VP for International Operations



Dwayne Sollenberger
Controller

Staff



Christopher McGee
Director of Finance

[photo: Faith Wang]
Faith Wang
Director of Human Resources

[photo: M. Epstein]
Marlowe Epstein
NNCO Communications Director

[photo: None]
Liesl Heeter
 NNCO IT Director & Project Manager



HEmant sarin, md
WTEC International Policy Fellow


Lisa friedersdorf, phd
Senior Policy Analyst

[photo: Jim Kadtke]
Jim Kadtke
Project Manager and Senior Scientist


David Kahaner
Advance Contractor



Grant Lewison
Advance Contractor




Pat Johnson
Freelance Technical Editor

 


Haydon Rochester, Jr.
Freelance Technical Editor


Larry Williamson
Freelance Technical Editor


[Matt Henderson]
Matt Henderson
 Technical Editor & Executive Assistant


[photo: h. ali]
Hassan Ali
Project Manager

[photo: K. Roy]
Dr. Victoria Gunderson
Science Policy Analyst

[photo: h. paikoush]
Halyna Paikoush
NNCO/Event Manager

[photo: K. Roy]
Kristin Roy
NNCO Webmaster

[photo: None]
Sam MoNbo
IT Support


Kevin O'Mara
Director of IT


[photo: K. Simmons]
Kevin Simmons
Senior Policy Analyst
[photo: K. Roy]
tarek fadel, phd
Policy Analyst
     


Organizational Chart

  • Shelton (President)
      • Sollenberger (Controller)
      • McGee (Director of Finance)
      • Wang (HR Director, Lancaster Office Manager, Contracting Officer)
      • Henderson (Assistant Project Manager)
      • O'Mara (Director of IT)
      • Sollenberger (Controller)
    • DeHaemer (Executive Vice President)
    • Huband (Sr. VP and General Counsel)
    • Nelson (Vice President for Development)
    • Holdridge (Vice President for Services, NNCO Chief of Staff)
      • Kadtke (Senior Policy Analyst)
      • Friedersdorf (Senior Policy Analyst)
      • Schwarzkopf (Senior Policy Analyst)
      • Simmons (Senior Policy Analyst)
      • Gunderson (Policy Analyst)
      • Epstein (Communications Director)
      • Roy (Webmaster)
      • Paikoush (Event Manager)
      • Johnson (Technical Editor)
    • Foland (VP for International Operations)
      • Ali (Project Manager)
      • Advance Contractors (Lewison, Kahaner)
      • Editors (Rochester, Williamson)
      • Sam Monbo (IT Support)

 

Copyright © [2012] World Technology Evaluation Center, Inc. (WTEC). All rights reserved.

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Coop Agreement no. ENG-0844639 and other NSF awards. Other Federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Department of Energy, and others.
staff3.htm0000644000076400007650000005433411757022462011474 0ustar wtecwtec World Technology Evaluation Center: The Staff

Meet the Staff

World Technology Evaluation Center

WTEC Web 2.0 wtec_youtube wtec_headlines wtec_email E-Mail WTEC

Senior Staff

photo: shelton
R.D. Shelton
President
Professional Page

[photo: M. DeHaemer]
Michael DeHaemer
Executive Vice President


Frank Huband
Sr. VP and General Counsel

[photo: g. holdridge]
Geoff Holdridge
Vice President for Services




David Nelson
Vice President for Development



Patricia Foland
VP for International Operations


[photo: A. Schwarzkopf]
Alex Schwarzkopf
Senior Policy Analist



Dwayne Sollenberger
Controller

Staff



Christopher McGee
Director of Finance

[photo: Faith Wang]
Faith Wang
Director of Human Resources

[photo: M. Epstein]
Marlowe Epstein
NNCO Communications Director

[photo: None]
Liesl Heeter
 NNCO IT Director & Project Manager



HEmant sarin, md
WTEC International Policy Fellow


Lisa friedersdorf, phd
Senior Policy Analyst

[photo: Jim Kadtke]
Jim Kadtke
Project Manager and Senior Scientist


David Kahaner
Advance Contractor



Grant Lewison
Advance Contractor




Pat Johnson
Freelance Technical Editor

 


Haydon Rochester, Jr.
Freelance Technical Editor


Larry Williamson
Freelance Technical Editor


[Matt Henderson]
Matt Henderson
 Technical Editor & Executive Assistant


[photo: h. ali]
Hassan Ali
Project Manager

[photo: K. Roy]
Dr. Victoria Gunderson
Science Policy Analyst

[photo: h. paikoush]
Halyna Paikoush
NNCO/Event Manager

[photo: K. Roy]
Kristin Roy
NNCO Webmaster

[photo: None]
Sam MoNbo
IT Support

[photo: Kevin O'Mara
Kevin O'Mara
Director of IT


[photo: Kevin Simmons]
Kevin Simmons
Senior Policy Analyst
[photo: K. Roy]
Tarek Fadel, phd
Policy Analyst

[photo: Tryon Wells]
Tryon Wells
Network Engineer
     


Organizational Chart

  • Shelton (President)
      • Sollenberger (Controller)
      • McGee (Director of Finance)
      • Wang (HR Director, Lancaster Office Manager, Contracting Officer)
      • Henderson (Assistant Project Manager)
      • O'Mara (Director of IT)
      • Sollenberger (Controller)
    • DeHaemer (Executive Vice President)
    • Huband (Sr. VP and General Counsel)
      • Wells (Network Engineer)
    • Nelson (Vice President for Development)
    • Holdridge (Vice President for Services, NNCO Chief of Staff)
      • Kadtke (Senior Policy Analyst)
      • Friedersdorf (Senior Policy Analyst)
      • Schwarzkopf (Senior Policy Analyst)
      • Simmons (Senior Policy Analyst)
      • Gunderson (Policy Analyst)
      • Epstein (Communications Director)
      • Roy (Webmaster)
      • Paikoush (Event Manager)
      • Johnson (Technical Editor)
    • Foland (VP for International Operations)
      • Ali (Project Manager)
      • Advance Contractors (Lewison, Kahaner)
      • Editors (Rochester, Williamson)
      • Sam Monbo (IT Support)

 

Copyright © [2012] World Technology Evaluation Center, Inc. (WTEC). All rights reserved.

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Coop Agreement no. ENG-0844639 and other NSF awards. Other Federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Department of Energy, and others.
staff.htm0000644000076400007650000001750012226053712011375 0ustar wtecwtec World Technology Evaluation Center: The Staff

Meet the Staff

World Technology Evaluation Center

WTEC Web 2.0 wtec_youtube wtec_headlines wtec_email E-Mail WTEC

Organizational Chart

  • President (R. D. Shelton)
      • Controller
      • Director of Finance
      • HR Director
    • Executive Vice President (Mike DeHaemer)
    • Sr. VP and General Counsel (Frank Huband)
    • VP for Government Services, NNCO Chief of Staff (Geoff Holdridge)
      • Policy Analysts
      • Communications Director
      • Webmaster
      • Technical Editor
    • VP for International Operations (Patricia Foland)
      • Project Managers
      • Advance Contractors
      • Editors
      • IT Support
 
Copyright © [2013] World Technology Evaluation Center, Inc. (WTEC). All rights reserved.

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Coop Agreement no. ENG-0844639 and other NSF awards. Other Federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Department of Energy, and others.
stafftest.htm0000644000076400007650000006355211570430272012306 0ustar wtecwtec World Technology Evaluation Center: The Staff

Meet the Staff

World Technology Evaluation Center

Senior Staff

photo: shelton
R.D. Shelton
President
Professional Page

[photo: M. DeHaemer]
Michael DeHaemer
Executive Vice President

[photo: g. holdridge]
Geoff Holdridge
Vice President for
Government Services


Frank Huband
Vice President for Operations and General Councel




David Nelson
Vice President for Development


 




Staff



Christopher McGee
Director of Finance

[photo: Faith Wang]
Faith Wang
Director of Human Resources

[photo: M. Epstein]
Marlowe Epstein
NNCO Communications Director

[photo: None]
Liesl Heeter
 NNCO IT Director & Project Manager



David Kahaner
Advance Contractor


Grant Lewison
Advance Contractor


Haydon Rochester, Jr.
Editor

[Matt Henderson]
Matt Henderson
 Technical Editor & Executive Assistant



Pat Johnson
Freelance Technical Editor

[photo: None]
Tracy Moore

[photo: Jim Kadtke]
Jim Kadtke
Project Manager and Senior Scientist


[photo: h. ali]
Hassan Ali
Project Manager


Patricia Foland
Project Manager

[photo: h. paikoush]
Halyna Paikoush
NNCO/Event Manager

[photo:Liesl Heeter]
Liesl Heeter
NNCO Network Engineer
and Project Manager


[photo: K. Roy]
Kristin Roy
NNCO Webmaster

[photo: None]
Sam Monbo
Database Developer/Administrator

[photo: None]
Kevin O'Mara
Information Systems Engineer

[photo: None]
LANCE MILLER


 




 




Organizational Break Down

  • Shelton (President)
        • McGee (Director of Finance, Sponsored Programs Officer)
        • Wang (Director of Human Resources, Lancaster Office Manager, Contracting Officer) 
        • Schwarzkopf (Senior Policy Analyst)
        • Henderson (Technical Editor and Executive Assistant)
        • O'Mara (Information Systems Engineer)
        • Gardner (Information Systems Engineer)
    • DeHaemer (Executive Vice President)
    • Nelson (Vice President for Development) 
    • Holdridge (Vice President for Government Services, NNCO Chief of Staff)
        • Heeter (Network Engineer and Project Manager)
        • Epstein (Acting Communications Director)
        • Roy (Assistant Webmaster)
        • Paikoush (Event Manager)
        • Johnson (Freelance Technical Editor) 
        • Kadtke (Senior Policy Analyst)
        • Consultants, editors, et al. for NNCO
    • Huband (Vice President for Operations and General Councel) 
        • Foland (Project Manager, Baltimore Office Manager)
        • Ali (Project Manager)
        • Advance Contractors (Lewison, Kahaner)
        • Part-Time Editors (Rochester)

 

Copyright © [2011] World Technology Evaluation Center Inc. (WTEC). All rights reserved

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant no. ENG-0739505 and other NSF awards. Other federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Food and Drug Administration.
study.htm0000664000076400007650000006412411647576677011502 0ustar wtecwtec World Technology Evaluation Center: Reports Online







By Mail

WTEC Inc.
2809 Boston St. , Suite 441
Baltimore, MD 21224
Phone: 410.276.7797
Fax: 410.276.7085

Email Address

CLICK HERE  TEXT VERSION OF WTEC SITE

 

Reports Online

 

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Supported Activities

 


Recommend, , Bulletin, Newsletter, Calendar


Copyright © [2002] World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC). All rights reserved

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant no. ENG-0104476 and other NSF awards. Other federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, and the Food and Drug Administration.

 

 

 

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template.htm0000664000076400007650000001523411377517762012131 0ustar wtecwtec World Technology Evaluation Center: Welcome

World Technology Evaluation Center


Copyright © [2007] World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC). All rights reserved

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant no. ENG-0423742 and other NSF awards. Other federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Food and Drug Administration.
templateNew.htm0000644000076400007650000001737511377517762012611 0ustar wtecwtec World Technology Evaluation Center: Welcome

World Technology Evaluation Center


Copyright © [2008] World Technology Evaluation Center Inc. (WTEC). All rights reserved

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant no. ENG-0739505 and other NSF awards. Other federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Food and Drug Administration.
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Reports Online

World Technology Evaluation Center

Study reports completed by WTEC Inc.

Study reports completed by Loyola/WTEC

Conference reports on-line


Copyright © [2006] World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC). All rights reserved

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant no. ENG-0423742 and other NSF awards. Other federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Food and Drug Administration.
benokraitis_t.html0000644000076400007650000001341511145072616013307 0ustar wtecwtec Benokraitis Professional Biography
[WTEC] logo
The nation's leading organization in conducting international technology assessments.

      

      

  Professional Biography

As Assistant Vice President, Dr. Ben Benokraitis supports the Executive Vice President in coordinating the execution and administration of WTEC programs, studies, and workshops, including the activities of ScienceUS.org.

 Before joining WTEC, Inc. in 2007, Ben Benokraitis served as Director of Graduate Programs in Computing and Associate Chair of the Computer Science Department at Loyola College in Maryland. In academia, Ben Benokraitis also established the computer science curriculum at Shepherd University in Shepherdstown, West Virginia and chaired its Department of Computer and Information Sciences. In industry, Ben Benokraitis managed programs in computing and software development at AAI Corporation, RCA Advanced Technology Laboratories, and Martin Marietta Baltimore Aerospace. In government, Ben Benokraitis worked as a mathematician for the Ballistic Research Laboratory at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

 Ben Benokraitis has extensive experience in software engineering, artificial intelligence, scientific computing, and a broad range of computing environments. He authored more than two dozen technical reports and papers. Ben Benokraitis holds a Ph.D. degree in Computer Sciences from the University of Texas at Austin.

Dr. V.J. (Ben) Benokraitis
 Assistant VP

 

Chicago Workshop Photos.html0000644000076400007650000000670611377537063015057 0ustar wtecwtec Nano 2


Chicago Workshop Photos



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



   

 

 


 


































Degischer S2-S11.html0000644000076400007650000002666211405732137013166 0ustar wtecwtec Untitled Document

Your name, affiliation and e-mail: 
H.Peter Degischer, Vienna University of Technology, Austria
hpdegi@pop.tuwien.ac.at

Your main topic(s) of expertise: metal matrix composites
Please answer a question only when you have important ideas or suggestions.  You are encouraged to include new ideas recognized by other research or professional groups.

  1.  How has the vision of nanotechnology changed in the last ten years? 
    Less fantastic, more realistic regarding application
    What is the state of the art now versus ten years ago?
    Opportunities of that class of materials are proposed: in nano-electronics, in pharmacy, for polymer and ceramic matrices,
    but there are still an increasing number of projects (publications) on metal matrix nano-composites (nano metal matrix composites are either dispersion strenghtened alloys or meaningless)
    Where is the field likely to go next?
    processing of ingredients and polymer/ceramic matrix nano composites in market relevant quantitities, reproducibility and reliability

 

  1. 1What are the main scientific/engineering advancements and technological impact in the last ten years? 
    Nano-composites are dominated by the interface properties not by the volume properties (i.e. strength, stiffness, conductivity of CNT are negligible with respect to interface properties in metals)

    What is the current status?
    Regarding metal matrix CNT composites are pointless, regarding so-called nano-particle composites which have been called so far dispersion strenghtened metals further development is possible;
    There are still EU-calls asking for research in metal matrix nano composites making people to invent unachievable targets


  1. 2What are the goals for the next 5-10 years: barriers and solutions?
    Generally: clear assessment of strength, weakness and opportunities in relation to demands.

 

Demands on structural materials:

 

 

 

 

  1. What are the needs for scientific and technological infrastructure?
  1. What R&D investment and implementation strategies would you suggest?

 

  1. What are the overall emerging topics and priorities for future NS&E research and education?
    honesty (opposing to research proposals pretending unachievable targets and to presentations of unverified results, particularly for metal matrix nano composites )

 

  1. 3What is the impact of nanotechnology R&D on society?
    Creating exaggerated hopes and inadequate research fundings (wasting money and disappointing society)


Real MMC are much better than nanocomposites  of metals
(dispersion strengthened (DS) or CNT reinforced)


      List of references

S.R.Bakshi et al.: CNT reinforced metal matrix composites, Int.Mat.Reviews, 55, 2010, 41-64
Z.Zhng, D.L.Chen: Consideration of Orowan strengthening effeect in particulate reinforced metal matrix nano composites; Sripta Mat. 54, 2006, 1321-1326
Q.Li et al.: Improved processing of CNT-Mg alloy composites, CSTE 69, 2009, 1193-1199
Q.Hjorstam et al.: Can we achieve ultra-low resistivity in CNT based metal composites, Appl.Phys.A78, 2004, 1175-1179
S.C.Tjong: CNT reinforced composites: metal and ceramic matrices, ISBN 978-3-527-40892-4, Wiley 2009

List of Tables proposed for the report (with important summary information)
Nano composites


Matrix

Nano ingredient

Achievement

Weakness

Scientific task / challenge

Envisaged advantage over existing materials

metals

whiskers

>10 vol% increase of stiffness, strength, wear resistance

Cancerogen whiskers, expensive

Health hazard

Lightweight (military) aerospace components

metals

CNT

Doubtful literature reports

Interface bonding, dispersion, expensive

Verify the pointlessness

No

metals

particles

Dispersion strengthened metals for elevated temperature structural applications

Powder metallurgy expensive

Improve mixing and consolidation technologies

Lightweight aerospace components, engine components

metals

Interpenetrating ceramic network

Indication of elevated temperature strength

Laboratory production

Processing of nanograins with oxide skins

Lightweight engine components

...

 

 

 

 

 

4
      List of Figures proposed for the report (conceptual, easy to understand)

 

      General bibliography on long-term perspective in nanotechnology

Not jet existing for metal matrix nano composites

 

 

 

employment1.html0000644000076400007650000001573011377517754012744 0ustar wtecwtec WTEC: Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

World Technology Evaluation Center

Current open positions

Position: Accountant

Location: WTEC, Inc. Baltimore, Md. Office

Posted: January 3, 2007

Position filled. Thank you for your submissions.

Position: Technical Writer

Location: National Nanotechnology Coordination Office, Arlington, VA

Posted: 2 March 2006

WTEC, Inc., provider of staff support to the National Nanotechnology Coordination Office in Arlington, VA, needs a science writer/copy editor for that office. Candidate must have at least five years of experience with a degree in English or Journalism or an equivalent amount of experience, plus college-level course work in physics, chemistry, and/or biology (or equivalent experience). Knowledge of and interest in nanotechnology preferred. The individual must have experience producing reports on science or technology-related subjects and in developing web content. The individual must be able to work on multiple projects and deadlines simultaneously with minimal supervision, arrange for final publication, including interface with production personnel.  The individual must be able to research, prepare and edit documents for publication and adhere to the highest standards for quality, format and style. A competitive salary and benefit package are available.

Interested candidates should send their resumés and a cover letter describing their background to hr@wtec.org or submit them via our on-line form.

Position: Linux Systems and Network Administration/Web Development/General IT Support for Office

Location: National Nanotechnology Coordination Office, Arlington, VA

Posted: 24 February 2006

Position filled. Thank you for your submissions.

Copyright © [2006] World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC). All rights reserved

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant no. ENG-0423742 and other NSF awards. Other federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Food and Drug Administration.
employment.html0000644000076400007650000001727311605432047012650 0ustar wtecwtec WTEC: Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

World Technology Evaluation Center

WTEC Web 2.0 wtec_youtube wtec_facebook wtec_twitter wtec_wikipedia wtec_headlines

Current open positions

Position: Accountant

Location: WTEC, Inc. Baltimore, Md. Office

Posted: January 3, 2007

Position filled. Thank you for your submissions.

Position: Technical Writer

Location: National Nanotechnology Coordination Office, Arlington, VA

Posted: 2 March 2006

WTEC, Inc., provider of staff support to the National Nanotechnology Coordination Office in Arlington, VA, needs a science writer/copy editor for that office. Candidate must have at least five years of experience with a degree in English or Journalism or an equivalent amount of experience, plus college-level course work in physics, chemistry, and/or biology (or equivalent experience). Knowledge of and interest in nanotechnology preferred. The individual must have experience producing reports on science or technology-related subjects and in developing web content. The individual must be able to work on multiple projects and deadlines simultaneously with minimal supervision, arrange for final publication, including interface with production personnel.  The individual must be able to research, prepare and edit documents for publication and adhere to the highest standards for quality, format and style. A competitive salary and benefit package are available.

Interested candidates should send their resumés and a cover letter describing their background to hr@wtec.org or submit them via our on-line form.

Position: Linux Systems and Network Administration/Web Development/General IT Support for Office

Location: National Nanotechnology Coordination Office, Arlington, VA

Posted: 24 February 2006

Position filled. Thank you for your submissions.

Copyright © [2006] World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC). All rights reserved

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant no. ENG-0423742 and other NSF awards. Other federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Food and Drug Administration.
index1.html0000644000076400007650000010045512223323167011641 0ustar wtecwtec Assessment of Physical Sciences and Engineering Advances in Life Sciences and Oncology (APHELION) :: Sponsored by NCI and NSF

Welcome ::::::

Assessment of Physical Sciences and Engineering Advances in Life Sciences and Oncology (APHELION)



 

Project Summary
 

This document describes a plan for the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Office of Physical Sciences - Oncology (OPSO) to participate in and co-sponsor a study led by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to conduct an international Assessment of Physical Sciences and Engineering Advances in Life Sciences and Oncology (APHELION). The APHELION is aimed at determining the status and trends of research and development whereby physical sciences and engineering principles are being applied to cancer research and oncology in leading laboratories and organizations via an on-site peer review process in Europe and Asia. The NSF has an existing contract with the World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC), Inc. under which the study will be conducted.

 

The mission of the NCI is to conduct and foster cancer research; reviewing and approving grant-in-aid applications to support promising research projects on the causes, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer; collecting, analyzing, and disseminating the results of cancer research conducted in the United States and in other countries; and providing training and instruction in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Over the years, NCI has evolved into the world's pre-eminent cancer research organization.

 

Under the leadership of the NCI Deputy Director, the Center for Strategic Scientific Initiatives (CSSI) coordinates several efforts both within and outside of NCI to carry-out its function of supporting timely execution and implementation of activities that have trans-NCI benefit. Within the NCI, the CSSI houses (1) The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Program Office; (2) Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research; (3) Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research; (4) Office of Physical Sciences - Oncology; (5) Office of Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research; (6) Office of Cancer Genomics; (7) Knowledge Management and Special Projects Branch; (8) Center for Global Cancer Health Research. These offices support extramural research programs and lead standards and policy development initiatives with the goal of accelerating advances in biomedical technology and furthering the vision of personalized medicine.

 

The NCI Office of Physical Sciences - Oncology (OPSO) (1) serves as a nexus for the development and implementation of physical science-based initiatives to enable progress in cancer research for NCI and its integration across trans-NCI, trans-NIH, and inter-agency activities; (2) enables the development of discoveries and new fields of study based on the application of aspects of the physical sciences approaches to cancer research; (3) and facilitates the exploration of novel and innovative approaches to advance our understanding of the physical laws and principles that shape and govern the emergence and behavior of cancer at all scales.

 

The NSF has long had a role in maintaining the general health of science and education across a range of universities and other organizations and has been deeply involved in funding research in engineering and the physical sciences. Recently, the NSF and the NCI have collaborated on a funding opportunity titled Physical and Engineering Sciences in Oncology (PESO) Awards [also known as the Physical and Life Sciences Early Research (PLIER) Awards].

 

The rationale for the NCI OPSO participation in the APHELION with NSF is based on the premise that significant advances may be expected as the result of continued investments in inter- and multi-disciplinary research at the intersection of the engineering/physical sciences and the life sciences. The field of cancer biology is one that has been dominated, historically, by researchers with classical training in the basic and clinical life sciences. More recently, the field has expanded to include physical and engineering scientists, whose background and expertise are complementary to those possessed by life scientists, leading to the recognition that significant advancements in the fundamental understanding of cancer diseases are possible through multidisciplinary research that involves experts in chemistry, physics, materials science, and manifold engineering disciplines. Emerging and burgeoning opportunities for collaborative research at the intersection of the physical/engineering sciences and the life sciences have been identified through several NSF workshops over the past few years. Furthermore, the NCI launched a program to bring new perspectives from the physical sciences to cancer biology and oncology in 2009. The Physical Sciences - Oncology Centers (PS-OCs) Program is in its third year of implementation and the OPSO will use the study to help develop relevant and novel funding concepts to further the mission of the NCI. Specifically, the OPSO seek novel research concepts at the interface of engineering/physical sciences and the life sciences with a focus on advancing the fundamental understanding of cancer biology to underpin translational research that promotes the prevention, detection, and treatment of cancer diseases.

 

Background

 

In 1971 President Nixon declared war on cancer, and much effort has been invested in learning more about this complex system of diseases, and in developing treatments. However, despite considerable progress in treatment of certain forms of cancer, progress in reducing its mortality by conventional biomedical approaches is disappointing. Thus, in addition to new biomedical approaches, such as those based on the human genome, some researchers are using concepts from the physical sciences. In the U.S. much of the research that applies physical sciences and engineering concepts to cancer biology and oncology is supported by the Office of Physical Sciences - Oncology (OPSO) at the National Cancer Institute. The OPSO is exploring innovative new approaches to better understand and control cancer by encouraging the convergence of the physical sciences with cancer biology and oncology. Building on stunning progress in the molecular sciences, it supports new research themes based on the application of physical sciences concepts and approaches to the major barriers in cancer research.


Examples of concepts being explored by the OPSO through its Physical Sciences Ė Oncology Centers (PS-OCs) Program are: (1) Applying physics and engineering laws and principles to cancer by defining the role of thermodynamics and mechanics in metastasis and determining how this knowledge might be employed in new intervention strategies; (2) Applying evolution and evolutionary theory to cancer by developing a comprehensive theoretical inclusive construct that would provide a foundation for understanding and predicting cancer heterogeneity; (3) Applying information theory to cancer by pursuing theoretical and supportive experimental approaches that define what information is and how it is decoded and managed in terms of cell signaling and contextual information translation in cancer; and (4) Deconvoluting cancer's complexity by pursuing theoretical and experimental approaches from the physical sciences to cancer complexity that will inform a new fundamental level of understanding of cancer that may facilitate prediction of viable pathways to develop novel interventions.

The NSF currently has an umbrella contract awarded to the World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC), Inc. to facilitate the assessment of research in engineering and science worldwide with the aim of maintaining U.S. leadership in these areas. WTEC is a non-profit research institute, which conducts international research assessment studies for the NSF, NIH, DOD, and other Federal agencies--more than 60 to date. Recent related studies include Nanotechnology Research Directions for Societal Needs in 2020, Brain-Computer Interfaces, Catalysis by Nanostructured Materials, Simulation-Based Engineering and Science, Rapid Vaccines Manufacturing, Tissue Engineering, and Systems Biology.

 

 

Purpose & Authority

 

The objective of this joint study with the NCI OPSO and the NSF is to utilize an expert panel consisting of prominent scientists in the field of applying physical sciences and engineering perspectives/principles to oncology and other biomedical areas to conduct site visits at overseas institutions to conduct an international Assessment of Physical Sciences and Engineering advances in Life Sciences and Oncology (APHELION). The findings of the APHELION will result in briefings to the sponsors, public workshops and a final report that will collectively provide a comprehensive, peer-reviewed set of evaluations of physical sciences-oncology research overseas in comparison to research being conducted in the United States.

This agreement is entered into under the authority of the National Science Foundation Act of 1950 as amended (42 USC 1861 et seq, specifically 1873(f) and section 241A and 301
of the Public Health Services Act, as amended.

These authorizations for these agencies, together with the internal policies and procedures of each agency, define the authority of the agencies to enter Into this agreement and to manage
this joint program focused on physical, mathematical, and engineering sciences or some combination of such the biological sciences.

Scope
 

WTEC shall conduct the international assessment of the current status and the trends of the application of physical sciences and engineering concepts to cancer biology, oncology and other biomedical areas. The objectives of an international assessment would be to:
- Guide and justify U.S. research investments
- Look for good ideas abroad (technology transfer, improving U.S. programs)
- Look for opportunities for cooperation and collaboration
- Compare U.S. R&D with that abroad

The study panel, under the guidance of the sponsors, will be instrumental in helping to develop a definitive scope of the study. Among these objectives related to the proposed study are:

- Information Transfer in Cancer and other Biomedical research areas through an Evolutionary Lens
o Can novel therapeutic strategies be developed based on increasing the genetic load of mutations in cancer cell population that will lead to extinction of this population?
o What genetic and epigenetic features define a cancer stem cell?
o Do oncogenic mutations confer self-renewal to cells?
o What is a gene and how is it regulated in time and space?


- Time Domain of Cancer Metastasis and other Diseases with Therapy
o Is the fluid phase biopsy of solid tumors an accurate real-time representation of the disease over the course of the patientís lifetime?
o How does the heterogeneity of a tumor or other diseased tissue impact drug response?


- Mechanics in Health and Disease
o Is Mechano-therapy of cancer possible?
o "Follow the genes" is the dominant paradigm. Can we develop a complementary "follow the physics" approach?
o What is role of forces in cancer metastasis?
o Can lessons learned from the roles that cell and tissue mechanics play in developmental biology be applied to cancer and other diseases?


- Physical Parameters of the Tumor Cells, Microenvironment, and Host
o How does a tumor cell change its genetic, epigenomic and metabolomic signature, as it becomes "successful" i.e. invasive, metastatic?
o Is the transport oncophysics of the microenvironment what really matters?
o What is the energy budget of a cancer cell compared to a developing cell and a mature normal cell?


- Understanding Physical Emergent Properties: What is Cancer?
o How can we change the physical microenvironment (selective pressures) to prevent cancer?
o Is cancer curable? Can it be controlled through manipulation of the microenvironment?
o Why do tumors ultimately make a phase transition to a metastatic phenotype?

The above list of topics will be refined by the panel members in consultation with the sponsors at the study kick-off meeting.

Tasks


Task 1
WTEC, in consultation with study sponsors, shall select a panel of six (6) U.S. experts (including the panel chair) in the field, who are familiar with international activities in the field. The panel chair shall have sufficient stature in this field to command respect in recruitment of panelists, and make presentations of results to peers. The chair also will have the necessary skills at leading a panel to efficiently conduct the study.

Task 2
The Contractor shall organize a sponsor meeting to be held in the Washington, DC metro area in January/February 2012 at which interested sponsors will attend along with the panel chair if they are available.

Task 3
After the sponsor meeting, the Contractor shall organize a kick-off meeting to be held in the Washington, DC metro area in February 2012 at which the expert panel, any scientific advisors, and interested sponsors will attend. At the kick-off meeting, the chair will define the scope of the study (with guidance from all of the agency sponsors) and assign each panelist a section of the final report. During the preliminary study, WTEC shall assist the panelists by conducting electronic literature searches. Password protected and public Web sites will be maintained by the WTEC during the study to facilitate the work of the panel.

Task 4
WTEC shall organize a fact-finding trip to Europe for the panel to visit centers of excellence in physical sciences and engineering for oncology and other biomedical areas. The sites will include sponsoring organizations, as well as top labs. Government observers will accompany the expert panel, to assist and gather information first hand.

Task 5
WTEC shall provide template site visit reports for each site visited to the study panel members and obtain draft site visit reports from the panel by July 2012.

Task 6
WTEC shall organize a workshop in the Washington, DC area for the presentation of the results in a timely fashion such that the final report may be produced in August 2012. Approximately 50 key participants from government and the private sector would be expected to attend a one-day discussion of the results. Each panelist will make a 30-minute presentation with visual aids, and the chair will give an overall summary. The workshop will be webcast to broaden its dissemination, including posting of the video for at least three years.

Task 7
WTEC shall provide a template analytical report to the study panel members and obtain a comprehensive draft analytical report from the panel by the beginning of August 2012.


Task 8
WTEC shall produce a final written report in August 2012, print and distribute 100 B&W bound hardcopies to study participants, hosts, and sponsors, and post the full report in color on the WTEC website.

Task 9
If sufficient funds are available to conduct a subsequent study in another continent, WTEC shall organize a fact-finding trip to Asia in the spring or early summer of 2013 with a second final written report that shall be produced no later than August 2013.

Schedules, Milestones, Deliverables

 

The schedule for the study will be determined at the kick-off meeting by mutual agreement of the sponsors, the WTEC staff, and the panel members. However, the first phase of the timeline shall be driven by a report deadline of August 1, 2012 for study that will be conducted in Europe.

Deliverable Deadline

Task 1: Selection of chair, panel members, and scientific advisors - January 2012

Task 2: Sponsor Meeting - February 2012

Task 3: Kick-off Meeting - March 2012

Task 4: Fact-finding trip to Europe - June 2012

Task 5: Draft site reports from study in Europe - July 2012

Task 6: Final workshop phase 1 - July 2012

Task 7: Draft analytical report from study in Europe - August 2012

Task 8: Final written report from study in Europe - August 2012

Task 9: Fact-finding trip to Asia (if sufficient funds allow) - May 2013
Draft site reports from study in Asia - June 2013
Final workshop phase 2 - July 2013
Draft analytical report from study in Asia - July 2013
Final written report from study in Asia - August 2013


DURATION, AMENDMENT, AND TERMINATION

This IAA is in effect for FY 2012 Ė FY 2013 and may be amended by signed written agreement between the NCI/NIH and NSF. The NCI/NIH or NSF may terminate this agreement by signed written notice provided, at least ninety days in advance. The IAA may be terminated immediately by the signed written agreement of all parties.

RESOLUTION OF DISAGREEMENTS

Should disagreement arise under this agreement, or amendments and/or revisions thereto, which cannot be resolved at the Assistant Director (NSF/ENG) and Deputy Director (NCI) level, the area(s) of disagreement shall be slated in writing by each Party and presented to the other Party at the Director or equivalent level for consideration.

 

THE PANEL
  • Paul Janmey
    (Panel Chair)
    ,
    University of Pennsylvania
    more>
  • Sharon Gerecht
    Johns Hopkins University
    more>
  • Cynthia Reinhart-King  ,
    Cornell University
    more>
  • Parag Mallick
    Stanford University
    more>
  • Owen McCarty
    Oregon Health & Science University
    more>
  • Lance L. Munn
    Harvard Medical School
    more>
Consultants

  • Antonio Tito Fojo ,
    Medical Oncology Branch and Affiliates
    more>
IMPORTANT LINKS

 

index2backup.html0000644000076400007650000003234611430033530013022 0ustar wtecwtec World Technology Evaluation Center: Welcome

World Technology Evaluation Center

WTEC is the nation's leading organization in conducting international technology assessments. During the 1990s, it was called the World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC) Division of Loyola University Maryland. In 2001, WTEC was spun off into a separate nonprofit corporation. 

More Information: About WTEC


Workshops

Sample Reports

  • The current directions in Vaccine Production were presented by a panel of experts who returned from a study of 30 sites and 5 different countries in Asia. The panel had compared findings in vaccine production with the latest research in the United States and Europe. This FREE workshop was held on May 5,2010 at NSF, 4201 Wilson Boulevard, Stafford II, Room 555, Arlington, VA 22230. More information.
  • Long-term Impacts and Future Opportunities for Nanoscale Science and Engineering Nanotechnology is a key element underpinning future progress in science and technology. A panel of experts, convened by the World Technology Evaluation Center, Inc. (WTEC) on behalf of NSF, has highlighted the progress being made in nanotechnology worldwide and the growing competitiveness of activities in this area outside the United States.  This workshop was held on March 9-10, 2010 at the Hotel Orrington Evanston, Illinois. Other workshops will be held in Europe and Asia as well. More information.
  • The current directions in Flexible Hybrid Electronics were presented by a panel of experts who visited over 20 sites in Europe. The study was sponsored by the United States National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Office of Naval Research (ONR) to examine the worldwide status and trends in this field. This FREE workshop was held on June 30, 2009 at NSF, 4201 Wilson Boulevard, Stafford II, Room 595, Arlington, VA 22230. More information.
  • Vision for Research and Development in Simulation-Based Engineering and Science (SBE&S) in the Next Decade SBE&S is a key element underpinning future progress in science and technology, as has been identified in numerous government, national academy, and other reports. A panel of experts, convened by the World Technology Evaluation Center, Inc. (WTEC) on behalf of a number of U.S. federal funding agencies, has highlighted the progress being made in SBE&S worldwide and the growing competitiveness of activities in this area outside the United States.  This workshop was held on April 22-23, 2009 at The National Academy of Sciences Building, 2100 C St NW, Washington, DC 20418More information.

Copyright © [2009] World Technology Evaluation Center, Inc. (WTEC). All rights reserved.

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant no. ENG-0739505 and other NSF awards. Other federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Food and Drug Administration.
index (2).html0000644000076400007650000001714212223322440012014 0ustar wtecwtec WTEC: Web Portal

Web Portal

Planning and Events

Please send all all corrections/additions for the above pages to Patricia: pfoland@wtec.org

Policies and Guidelines for WTEC Employees


Copyright © [2011] World Technology Evaluation Center Inc. (WTEC). All rights reserved

Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant no. ENG-0739505 and other NSF awards. Other federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Food and Drug Administration.
index.existing.html0000644000076400007650000003346512223322756013422 0ustar wtecwtec World Technology Evaluation Center: Index

WTEC Web 2.0 wtec_youtube wtec_facebook wtec_twitter wtec_wikipedia wtec_headlines

World Technology Evaluation Center

WTEC is the nation's leading organization in conducting international technology assessments. During the 1990s, it was called the World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC) Division of Loyola University Maryland. In 2001, WTEC was spun off into a separate nonprofit corporation. 

More Information: About WTEC

WTEC International

Assesing the world's best technologies

WTEC Services

POConcierge Service

What's new

What's new

  • NNCO supplement to the President's 2012 budget

    2012 Budget
    NNCO Report

  • NNCO strategic plan report.

    StrategicPlan
    NNCO Report

  • New NNCO website
  • Something on new award for I/UCRC centers and Alex Schwarzkopf
  • NNCO Reports


  • Copyright © [2011] World Technology Evaluation Center, Inc. (WTEC). All rights reserved.

    Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Coop Agreement no. ENG-0844639 and other NSF awards. Other Federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Food and Drug Administration.
    indexMainPage1.html0000644000076400007650000003356612223322447013253 0ustar wtecwtec World Technology Evaluation Center: Index

    World Technology Evaluation Center

    WTEC Web 2.0 wtec_youtube wtec_facebook wtec_twitter wtec_wikipedia wtec_headlines

    WTEC is the nation's leading organization in conducting international technology assessments. During the 1990s, it was called the World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC) Division of Loyola University Maryland. In 2001, WTEC was spun off into a separate nonprofit corporation. 

    More Information: About WTEC

    WTEC International

    Assesing the world's best technologies

    WTEC Services

    POConcierge Service

    What's new

    What's new

  • NNCO supplement to the President's 2012 budget

    2012 Budget
    NNCO Report

  • NNCO strategic plan report.

    StrategicPlan
    NNCO Report

  • New NNCO website
  • Something on new award for I/UCRC centers and Alex Schwarzkopf
  • NNCO Reports


  • Copyright © [2011] World Technology Evaluation Center, Inc. (WTEC). All rights reserved.

    Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Coop Agreement no. ENG-0844639 and other NSF awards. Other Federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Food and Drug Administration.
    Nano2EducationalVideoText.html0000644000076400007650000002453211613604733015437 0ustar wtecwtec NSF Educational video: What is Nanotechnology

    NSF Educational Video: What is Nanotechnology

    World Technology Evaluation Center

    WTEC Web 2.0 wtec_youtube wtec_facebook wtec_twitter wtec_wikipedia wtec_headlines

    Hello and welcome to this National Science Foundation video on nanotechnology. In the next ten years some scientists hope to develop atoms or molecules that assemble themselves into microscopic structures, tissue engineering inside the human body to rebuild damaged spinal cord parts and other organs, improve long life batteries to drive electric vehicles long distances, develop more efficient and less expensive solar energy, better performing aircraft made out of stronger and lighter materials, and other inventions we can't even dream of today all because of the new science ďnanotechnologyĒ.

    Science is all about studying our world and learning how it works; often scientists can use what they discover to make our lives better. Right now, a lot of scientists are really excited about the new science of nanotechnology, the study and control of atoms and molecules. Scientists study things that are nanoscale in size. That's another new word to learn. Nanoscale means that things are very very small, but how small? Well this dime it's pretty small, and if I could become small enough to dance on this dime, I would still be a whole lot larger than a nanoparticle. To get that small I would need to shrink down to fit inside the molecules that make up the dime. Things down here in nanoscale are measured in nanometers, but we don't need to be that tiny ourselves to study nanotechnology or to make it work for us. A nanometer is one billionth of a meter. Okay here is a different way to picture that; imagine you have strains that are all each one nanometer thick. Now imagine you take one hundred thousand of those one nanometer thick strings and bundle them together. The bundle would fit inside one strand of your hair. Uh... well, you can look at one of your hairs.

    Scientists work with materials that are between one nanometer and one hundred nanometers in size. That's still amazingly small, but scientists don't just study nanomaterials because they're small, they want to make nanomaterials do useful work for us. That's possible because with ordinary materials get down to the nanometer scale they start to act differently. And each time the particle size changes the behavior changes again. That multiplies the number of uses we can get from each material that exists in the world. So instead of just discovering materials in nature, we can design them to have selected properties.

    Researchers are studying these different properties of nanomaterials and looking for ways to use them: in biology, chemistry, physics, medicine, electronics, and many other sciences to make our lives better. Scientists predict that in the future nanotechnology could be used to help broken bones heal quicker, make faster and more powerful computers, build stronger buildings of new nanomaterials, extract pure water, energy and minerals from dirty water, clean up oil spills, and do many other amazing things that we can't even imagine yet.

    Many scientists believe nanotechnology might help to solve a lot of the world's problems. For example, one problem is the need for more and more energy. The next forty years, scientists predict the world will need twice much energy as we use now. Some of our energy is produced by burning coal or oil, which has a limited supply and pollutes the environment. What if we could find a way to make energy that is abundant, low-cost, and good for the environment? Well, you might have learned in science class that plants use sunlight to convert carbon dioxide into fuel in a process called photosynthesis. Now, what if we could do the same thing? Did you know that more energy from the sun strikes the earth in one hour than all of us can use in a whole year? Well that's what Dr. Jeff Brinker said at a recent nanotechnology conference: ďAnother area thatís gotten a lot of attention is photosynthesis. Photosynthesis is wonderful in that it converts the photo energy directly to fuel. It's a blueprint for sustainable energy but photosynthesis a system, and so the nanostructure analogs or the synthetic analogs have to be now systems of nanostructuresĒ Dr. Brinker was at a nanotechnology conference in 2010 in Washington D.C., where researchers gathered together to talk about the progress they've made and what they hope to develop in the future. At the same conference, Dr. Mark Hersam talked about new high-performance nanomaterials: ďIf you look at advanced aerospace they are many places where nano is going to be emerging; one example will be in by the hydrophobic coatings of the airplane wings, thermal barrier coatings, and transparent electronics to be integrated into the windshield for displays.Ē

    You could see how excited those scientists are about their work. That's because nanotechnology has created new opportunities for research and because nanotechnology is so new and there are so many applications to explore that there'll be a need for a lot of nanoscientists for many many years into the future. Nanotechnology - it's a small world with room for a lot of researchers. You might even decide to become one of the scientist explorers and discover great new nanotechnology applications that help people live better. All you need is curiosity, and of course, study in math and science. The nano world will be waiting for you.


    Copyright © [2011] World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC). All rights reserved

    Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant no. ENG-0844639 and other NSF awards. Other federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Food and Drug Administration.
    new.html0000644000076400007650000001356011377517756011264 0ustar wtecwtec WTEC: Reports

    What is New!

    World Technology Evaluation Center

    qis.html0000664000076400007650000001351411377517757011271 0ustar wtecwtec Quantum Information Science NSF logoDarpa logo

    Quantum Information Science


    Short Course in Innsbruck, Austria

    A three-day short course designed to encourage recruitment of post-doctorates into the field of Quantum Information Science (QIS) will be held May 29-31, 2002 at the Hotel Europa Tyrol in Innsbruck, Austria.

    Postdoctoral physicists and senior graduate students interested in QIS research are invited to apply for financial support to attend this short course, taught by leading physicists from Europe and the United States. Successful applicants will also be considered for postdoctoral positions in leading U.S. universities involved in QIS research, if desired.

    Topics to be discussed include:

    • Atomic physics
    • Quantum information theory
    • Quantum optics
    • Semiconductor nanostructures
    • Spintronics
    • Superconductivity
    Confirmed faculty members include:
    Professor David D. Awschalom (co-chair)
    Department of Physics
    University of California
    Santa Barbara, California

    Professor Daniel Loss (co-chair)
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Basel
    Basel, Switzerland

    Professor Dik Bouwmeester
    Centre for Quantum Computation
    Clarendon Laboratory
    University of Oxford
    Oxford, United Kingdom

    Professor Hans Briegel
    Theoretische Physik
    Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität
    München, Germany

    Professor Artur Ekert
    Centre for Quantum Computation
    Clarendon Laboratory
    University of Oxford
    Oxford, United Kingdom

    Professor Jeffrey Kimble
    Norman Bridge Laboratory of Physics
    California Institute of Technology
    Pasadena, California

    Professor Leo Kouwenhoven
    Department of Applied Physics
    Delft University
    Delft, The Netherlands

    Professor Umesh Vazirani
    Computer Science Division
    University of California
    Berkeley, California

    Professor Peter Zoller
    Institute of Theoretical Physics
    Universität Innsbruck
    Innsbruck, Austria

    Background

    Quantum information science (QIS) is a new field of science and technology, combining and drawing on the disciplines of physical science, mathematics, computer science, and engineering. Its aim is to understand how certain fundamental principles of physics discovered early in the 20th century can be harnessed to dramatically improve the acquisition, transmission, and processing of information. The exciting scientific opportunities offered by QIS are attracting the interest of a growing community of scientists and technologists, and are promoting unprecedented interactions across traditional disciplinary boundaries. Advances in QIS may become increasingly critical to our national competitiveness in information technology during the coming century. QIS also opens the door to empirical investigations of basic issues in the foundations of physics, which might well have technological implications beyond what we can even imagine today.

    It has long been known that atoms and other tiny objects obey laws of quantum physics that in many respects defy common sense. Until recently, such quantum effects have mostly been seen as a nuisance, causing small devices to be less reliable and more error-prone than their larger cousins. Now researchers in several disciplines have begun to learn how to exploit quantum effects to perform important and otherwise impossible information-processing tasks. A quantum computer, if one can be built, could perform some computations that would take longer than the age of the universe on today's supercomputers. The way in which quantum effects speed up computation represents the potential for a qualitative improvement, like the improvement one gets from calculating with decimals instead of Roman numerals. For the first time, the physical form of information has a qualitative rather than merely a quantitative bearing on how efficiently the information can be processed, and the things that can be done with it.

    Experts in the field agree that the bottleneck limiting progress in QIS is the limited number of post-doctoral fellows now conducting research. Thus the primary purpose of the Innsbruck short course is to encourage recruitment of post-docs into the field. The course is being organized by the World Technology Evaluation Center of Baltimore, Maryland, USA and is supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

    Application to Attend Short Course

    Although all applicants will be considered, particular interest is in researchers at the post-doctoral level with experimental physics background in the topic areas listed above. Successful applicants will receive support for all registration, hotel, and meal expenses, plus an allowance for travel within Europe.

    An application form will be added to this web site within a few days. To be notified of its availability, please send your name and e-mail address to Stephen Gould  -- sgould@wtec.org
     
     

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    templatep.html0000644000076400007650000001010611377517762012454 0ustar wtecwtec World Technology Evaluation Center: Welcome

    World Technology Evaluation Center


    Copyright © [2006] World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC). All rights reserved

    Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant no. ENG-0423742 and other NSF awards. Other federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Food and Drug Administration.
    Test_save.html0000664000076400007650000000033111377517762012417 0ustar wtecwtec Test save Test welcome2.html0000644000076400007650000004423311377517764012210 0ustar wtecwtec WTEC Study on Brain-Computer Interface Research

    Advances in computational technology, component miniaturization, biocompatibility of materials, and sensor technology will lead to  improved feasibility of useful brain-computer interfaces in the next five years. Since the 1970s there has been increasing interest among agencies of the Federal government, such as NSF, DARPA, ONR, AFOSR, U.S. Army, NIST, and NIH, state agencies, universities, and private industry in improving human-computer interaction and developing a BCI system.

    Judging from scientific papers published in technical journals and at conferences, BCI has seen increasing interest since 2000, when the First International Meeting on Brain-Computer Interface Technology was held and reported in the IEEE Transactions on Rehabilitation Engineering. The literature of the field has doubled since 2002.

    Experiments with animals and demonstrations by a few human quadriplegics have shown that useful neural signals from the brain can be sensed, interpreted and used to drive a computer or simple prosthetic device. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has an initiative to fully develop a brain signal interfaced prosthetic arm within five years. Similar commercially developed prosthetics are expected to follow rapidly.

    Hardware, software and devices for BCI research are available and being developed at universities and are being spun-off intcommercial enterprises, for example, the University of Utah Array, the University of Michigan Array and biomimetic VSLI chips at the University of Southern California. These technologies are now enabling rapid advancement of neural signal recording and interpretation for prosthetic devices.

    Neuron firing in the brain may be detected through electrodes normally inserted in the cortex, singly or in multiple electrode arrays, or through electrodes placed non-invasively in contact with the scalp using electroencephalographic methods (EEG). Magnetoencephalographic activity (MEG), thermography, functional MRI interpretation and analysis of near infrared spectrum (NIRS) activity are being considered as auxiliary sensing methods.

    Need for an International Study

    Significant activity in BCI research is evident overseas and in Canada. Japanese research in the use of near infrared spectrum (NIRS) sensing and interpretation may be leading the world. The University of Tuebingen, Germany, Lund University, Sweden, Fraunhofer Institute, Berlin,  Korean Research Institute,  Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Japan,  and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne, among others, have ongoing research programs in BCI. China and Brazil are emerging with active research programs in BCI. The Defense Evaluation Research Agency of the U.K. also has programs in BCI research.

    Understanding the status and trends in BCI research abroad will inform program managers in U.S. research agencies and the researchers in the field to enable more effective scientific exchanges, direct more focused research in promising areas, and produce international collaboration.

    Purpose and Scope

    Purpose

    The goal of this study is to gather information on the worldwide status and trends in brain-computer interface research and to disseminate it to government decision makers and the research community.

    The study panelists will gather information on BCI research abroad, which will be useful to the U.S. Government in its own programs. The study will critically analyze and compare the research in the United States with that being pursued in Japan, Europe, or other selected countries. This information will serve the following purposes:

    • Identify good ideas overseas worth exploring in U.S. R&D programs
    • Clarify research opportunities and needs for promoting progress in the field generally
    • Identify specific opportunities (persons and institutions) for international collaboration
    • Evaluate the position of foreign research programs relative to those in the U.S.

    Scope of the Study

    The study will review the status and trends of research and development with respect to BCI that are important for achieving successful implementation of BCI systems. The study will emphasize the neural engineering and systems engineering aspects of BCI, including computational algorithms and control methods, to effect synthetic human motor movement through neuroprosthetic systems, i.e. manipulation of a prosthesis or tele-operated device,  in response to planned motor movement (PMM) activity in the applicable area of the cortex.

    The sponsors of the BCI study in consultation with the chair person will specify the scope of the study. The discussion below is meant to aid in the determination of the desired priorities of the assessment of BCI abroad.

    In a recent informal discussion at a BCI workshop at MITRE Corporation, Tysons Corner, VA, leading researchers suggested that the following areas were important to advancing achievements in the field.

    • Improved implantable components: biocompatibility of electrodes for long term use; arrays conforming the gyri and folds of the cortex; finer resolution of neural activity
    • Mathematical modeling methods for large amounts of data produced by arrays of 100 electrodes or more
    • Sensor development and new approaches to delivery to cortical sites of interest, perhaps through nanodevices
    • Improved probability modeling for neural spike train signals
    • Solving dexterous manipulation with feedback and control systems
    • Providing actuator technology, component miniaturization, and energy storage, light enough for human wearability of the systems
    • Better understanding of electro-physical and systems activities of the cortex
    • Creation of standard data sets for evaluating various newly developed algorithms and modeling assumptions

    Among the significant elements of research are:

    • Signal detection of PMM, which may be through direct probing of the cortex, or remotely through associated e-m or other signals at the scalp or e-m signals along other neural pathways which convey PMM
    • Signal Processing and Control
      • Noise filtering
      • Recognition of PMM signals
      • Production of effector command signals
      • Control and tuning of effector commands through appropriate sensing mechanisms for the activity
      • Measuring effectiveness of processing and control through use of standard data sets and other methods
      • Efficiency and effectiveness of processing algorithms
    • Bioengineering of multielectrode sensing arrays
    • Prosthetics/Effectors
      • May be computer controlled prosthesis or other devices
      • May have embedded intelligence with appropriate distributed control system
    • Applications
      • May include successful animal research with transfer potential to humans
      • Will include both invasive and non-invasive signal sensing systems
      • May include work on wireless sensor transmitters embedded in the cortex or
      • Other neural pathways (Since cochlear implants and synthetic vision implants are extensive research areas in their own right, this study will NOT assess those fields.)

    The following lists issues that may be of interest in assessing the field.

    • Theories of cognitive and neural operations for motor control from a bioengineering perspective
    • Cortical plasticity impacted by BCI and impacting on BCI
    • Neural signals dependence (or independence) of normal neuromuscular control channels
    • Sensors for neural activity
    • Research on capacities and limitations of non-muscular communication channels
    • Analytical methods, algorithms and systems for neural sensor input
    • Computer software, hardware, and useful peripherals
    • Design of the computer interface for direct neural input
    • Implant retrieval/patient follow-up
    • Feedback control; control algorithms
    • Sensing and measuring techniques
    • Limitations/advances of cognitive science in this field
    • Special requirements for different injuries and impairments of the users
    • Training methods for the user and the artificial intelligence of a computer interface
    • Subject training (operand conditioning) vs. machine training
    • Invasive vs. non-invasive measurements of neural signals
    • Evoked potentials vs. spontaneous central nervous system (CNS) responses
    • Signal processing and machine learning techniques for BCI
    • Successful applications of BCI
    • Implant retrieval and follow up with patients
    • Metrics for measuring and sensing
    • Tactile sensing for feedback, especially in artificial limbs

    Since the result of the assessment of BCI abroad will inform U.S. government research support and policies, topics related to policy, research direction, new education programs, and technology transfer may be of interest: 

    • Higher education curriculum advances to facilitate BCI
    • Government programs and policies with respect to BCI
    • Technology transfer programs in support of BCI
    • Cultural, ethical, and political considerations for use of brain activity information and prosthetic devices
    • What are the regulatory issues? How are they handled abroad?
    • What are some of the obstacles and limitations to further progress in this area?
    • What are the suggested future areas of study? What are the opportunities?

    Panel

    Ted Berger
    Theodore
    W. Berger
    (Panel Chair)

    • Professor of Biomedical Engineering, David Packard Chair in Engineering
      Neurophysiology of memory and learning, nonlinear systems analysis of hippocampal network properties, neurobiology.
    • Dr. Theodore W. Berger
      David Packard Professor
      Department of Biomedical Engineering and Neuroscience Program
      Director, Center for Neural Engineering
      166 Denney Research Bldg.
      University of Southern California
      Los Angeles, CA  90089
    • Web: http://bme.usc.edu/directory/faculty/primary-faculty/theodore-w-berger/
    John Chapin

    John Chapin

    Greg A. Gerhardt

      Greg A. Gerhardt

    • Greg A. Gerhardt, Ph.D. Professor,
      Departments of Anatomy & Neurobiology, Neurology and Psychiatry
      Director, Morris K. Udall Parkinson's Disease Research Center of Excellence
      Director, Center for Sensor Technology
      306 MRISC Bldg.
      800 Rose Street
      University of Kentucky
      Lexington, KY  40536-0098
    • Web: http://www.mc.uky.edu/neurobiology/research/gerhardt.asp

    Dennis McFarland

    Dennis McFarland

    • Dennis McFarland, Ph.D. Research Scientist
      Wadsworth Laboratories
      PO Box 509
      Empire State Plaza
      Albany, NY 1220
    Jose C. Principe

    Jose C. Principe

    Dawn M. Taylor

    Dawn M. Taylor

    • Dawn M. Taylor, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering
      Case Western Reserve University
      Wickenden Building 108
      10900 Euclid Avenue
      Cleveland, OH 44106-7207
    • Web: http://bme.case.edu/faculty_staff/taylor/
    Patrick A. Tresco

    Patrick A. Tresco

    • Patrick A. Tresco, Ph.D. Professor
      Department of Bioengineering
      Director, Keck Center for Tissue Engineering
      108D BPRB
      University of Utah
      Salt Lake City, Utah 84112
    • Web: http://www.bioen.utah.edu/faculty/PAT/
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    • The World Technology Evaluation Center, Inc. is the nation's leading organization in conducting international research assessments via peer review. These qualitative assessments are supplemented with quantitative ones via bibliometrics.
    • WTEC has conducted over 70 such studies since 1989, far more than any other private organization.
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    • Sponsors include most of the Federal research agencies: NSF, ONR, DARPA, EPA, NASA, NIST, the National Cancer Institute and several other NIH institutes, et al.
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    • Most reports become books by major publishers. Recent ones published by Springer are on: converging technologies, nanotechnology 2020, biosensing, systems biology, micromanufacturing, and brain computer interfaces.¬† The Imperial College Press has published books on robotics, nanocatalysis, and simulation-based engineering.¬† The Academic Press, Kluwer, and Noyes Publishers published a half-dozen WTEC books earlier.
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    • A WTEC vice president, Patricia Foland, has recently organized an affiliated woman-owned, minority small business, Maryland Research Services, LLC. (dba MRS, LLC)

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    • Nano2
        Nano K-12 In the next ten years some scientists hope to develop atoms or molecules that assemble themselves into microscopic structures, tissue engineering inside the human body to rebuild damaged spinal cord parts and other organs, improve long life batteries to drive electric vehicles long distances more efficient and less expensive solar energy, better performing aircrafts made out of stronger and lighter materials, and other inventions we can't even dream of today all because of the new science ďnanotechnologyĒ. More...

      • Nanotechnology K-12 Educational Video
      • Final Workshop Webcast
      • Nanotechnology K-12 Educational Video (WTEC archived version)

    Copyright © [2011] World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC). All rights reserved

    Material contained in this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant no. ENG-0844639 and other NSF awards. Other federal agencies contributing to WTEC reports include the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Commerce, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Food and Drug Administration.